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Posts tagged "Bigotry"

thepoliticalfreakshow:

Ohio State University marching band director Jonathan Waters was abruptly fired this week, following a two-month investigation of the band’s rumored hazing rituals that found he witnessed and silently approved of the deeply offensive, disgusting and blatantly homophobic conduct happening among its members.

According to the report, obtained and published by Deadspin, band members kept a physical booklet that included the lyrics to the vulgar parody “fight songs” they wrote. While many of the songs are directly inspired by the fight songs of rival schools (“Come blow us, Michigan, Our cocks are waiting for you”), some of the most vulgar songs are totally out of left field.

Take, for instance, this one called “Proud to be a Homosexual”. Set to the tune of “God Bless the USA”, the chorus reads:

And I”m proud to be a homosexual,
Where at least I can run free.
And I won’t forget the fags with AIDS,
Who gave that right to me.
And I’ll gladly bend over,and spread my cheeks,
So you may sodomize me.

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The lovely “Pieces of Baritone Shit” is even more shocking:

Bite my ass and lick my balls you mother fucking queers,
Get on your knees and tell me how the megaphone fits up your mother-fucking ass YOU GAY FAGS!
Lick my balls and lube up your ass,
Anal sex gives you nasty gas.
Fuck you, you big gay fags.
You pieces of Baritone shit!

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Another song, titled “Brigham Young is a Goddamn Queer”, is…well…here:

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The report also reveals the disgusting nicknames given to underclassmen, almost all inspired directly by sexual acts. A female student “pretending to be a vibrating sex toy” was named “E Row Vibrator”; a male student “conducting a full-body demonstration of a flaccid penis becoming erect” was “Jizzy.”

Other names given to students included “Jewoobs,” “Squirt,” “Testicles,” “Twat Thumper,” and “Twinkle Dick.”

As expected, the news has led to media hunt in search of Waters’ all-time lows. Early this morning, Ohio State University released an audio clip of Waters “disciplining” a band member:

The public, understandably, is outraged:

This Illini fan HATES Ohio State, and this is yet more reason I HATE them. 

thepoliticalfreakshow:

Many may have forgotten, but Tea Party Congresswoman Michele Bachmann got her start in politics by being one of Minnesota’s most anti-gay activists. Like many, the school board was her stomping ground, and Bachmann quickly gained a strong base among the radical religious right. 

Bachmann claimed “the gay and lesbian lifestyle, it’s bondage. It is personal bondage, personal despair and personal enslavement.”  She insisted it is “child abuse” to even discuss homosexuality with children. And she’s called being gay “the very real issue of sexual dysfunction.”

LOOK: Michele Bachmann’s Top Ten Anti-Gay Quotes

After Rep. Bachmann’s disastrous 2012 presidential campaign, for which she, her husband, and her campaign have been the target of several ethics investigations by several entities, including the Office of Congressional Ethics, the nation heard less and less from the four-term, 58-year old, Evangelical Christian Congresswoman, who announced last year she will not be seeking a fifth term.

Less and less, until now.

This week Bachmann announced, “there’s a chance I could run" for President.

And on Wednesday, Rep. Bachmann gave an interview with the conservative radio show, “Faith & Victory,” and harkened back to her extremist anti-gay roots.

Calling it “the rise of tyranny,” Bachmann claims there is “legislation being pushed all across the United States to punish people who don’t agree with” LGBT equality.

"It’s the basis for hate speech laws across the United States," Bachmann said. "This is an effort to have government coerce, force, speech and behavior, and it’s being pushed and advocated by the gay community."

Bachmann, who has spent decades railing against the LGBT community, same-sex marriage, and even gay people raising children, now claims that she supports a “diversity of opinion,” but the LGBT community does not.

"Today," Bachmann continued, "the big push is on transgender."

"I believe we’re going to see coming an effort for multiple in marriage. Not just tow, but multiple in marriage. I think they want to legalize that."

"Also, they want to abolish age of consent laws. We would do away with statutory rape laws, so adults would be able to freely prey on little children sexually. That’s the deviance that we’re seeing embraced in our culture today.”

Listen:

Editor’s note: This is the first in a short series of excerpts from Bachmann’s interview — stay tuned for more later in the day.

Image by Gage Skidmore via Flickr
Hat tip and audio: Right Wing Watch

I don’t trust Jews who change their names.
Right-wing radio host Mark Levin goes after Jon Stewart with an anti-Semitic smear after once likening Obamacare supporters to Nazis.  (via mediamattersforamerica)

(via mediamattersforamerica)

thenewrepublic:

In the 1830s, cholera was described as an “Irish disease.”

In the late 1800s tuberculosis was portrayed as a “Jewish disease.”

In 1900, San Franciscans quarantined Chinatown and threatened to burn it down.

In 2005, Lou Dobbs’s CNN show falsely reported that there had been 7,000 leprosy cases.

In 2006, Pat Buchanan claimed that that “clearly the illegal aliens” were to blame for the rise in bedbug infestations.

And now, a Republican is predicting a pandemic because of migrant kids.

Bradlee Dean has it ass-backwards. 

h/t: Brian Tashman at RWW

On what planet is Sen. Majority Leader Harry Reid an “atheist Mormon?” 

Only In David Barton’s world. 

H/T: Kyle Mantyla at RWW

Texas Values president Jonathan Saenz agreed with a right-wing radio host that gay activists are trying to put Christians in concentration camps, asserting that the gay rights movement wants “to put people in jail” if they disagree with marriage equality and “the homosexual lifestyle.”

In a June 20 interview with Raging Elephants Radio, Saenz condemned a recent Colorado Civil Rights Commission ruling affirming that a Denver-area baker had violated the state’s non-discrimination law by refusing to bake a cake for a same-sex couple. Host Claver Kamau-Imani asked Saenz whether the ruling was tantamount to sending the baker to a “concentration camp.” Saenz agreed, asserting that there’s “no question” gay rights supporters ultimately aim to imprison opponents of LGBT equality:

KANAU-IMANI: Alright, let’s get back to Colorado. So you have a baker that does wedding cakes and they say they don’t want to do a two-man wedding cake or a two-woman wedding cake with the little figurines on top or whatever. And so the homosexual couple, whether it’s man and man, woman and woman, whatever, they go to this specially created commission to deal with this, file a complaint against the business, and so the commission says ‘No, you’re gonna make this cake, plus, you’re going to go to concentration camp,’ essentially. Is that what you’re telling us, Jonathan?

SAENZ: That’s right, that’s right. You know, they tried to do something like that here in Texas - I think it was a bill by Sen. Rodney Ellis that dealt with hate crime stuff, where they would’ve forced you to participate in an event of the quote-unquote community that you had offended. And so we testified against this legislation and it ended up dying on the Senate side. But I mean, this is what they want. I mean, there’s no question. I’ve seen it. I’ve seen them try to do it with legislation here in Texas at the state level. It is a goal of theirs to put people in jail that disagree with homosexual marriage, without question - or the homosexual lifestyle. [emphasis added]

This isn’t the first time Saenz has resorted to extreme rhetoric to attack LGBT equality. A prominent opponent of local efforts to combat anti-LGBT discrimination in Texas, Saenz has also predicted “polygamy and polyandry" and marriage between step-parents and step-children as a result of marriage equality. A vocal proponent of discredited “ex-gay" therapy programs, his solution to the problem that gay people exist is telling them that "it’s never too late" for them to "change."

As the debate over LGBT rights in Texas intensifies, Saenz’s latest remarks and his history of inflammatory rhetoric underscore why media outlets shouldn’t take him seriously.

h/t: Luke Brinker at MMFA

thepoliticalfreakshow:

Duck Dynasty patriarch Phil Robertson explained over the weekend that people had misunderstood the intent of his homophobic comments because he was just “trying to help those poor souls and turn them to Jesus.”

Speaking at the Rock the South festival Cullman, Alabama on Saturday, Robertson defended comments he made to GQ magazine last year comparing homosexuality to bestiality and adultery.

Robertson had argued that “a vagina — as a man — would be more desirable than a man’s anus,” and said that LGBT people “won’t inherit the kingdom of God. Don’t deceive yourself. It’s not right.”

On Saturday, Robertson told the crowd that he was “actually a nice man,” according to the Birmingham News.

“I’m trying to help those poor souls and turn them to Jesus,” he said.

Robertson also shared his thoughts on marriage, saying that any woman older than a teenager was too old to marry.

“You don’t wait for ‘em to be 20 yrs old to marry ‘em. That’s too old,” he reportedly remarked. He also said that a Southern man needed “a wife he can stand,” who would pick the feathers off his ducks.

At the conclusion of his talk, the Duck Dynasty founder urged the audience to register to vote.

“Hey, Alabama, whatever you do, register to vote for this presidential election!” Robertson exclaimed. “Go vote for the House and the Senate, too. Vote this ungodly bunch out of Washington, D.C!”

Watch the video below from the Rock the South festival, recorded on June 21, 2014.

6dogs9cats:

“It’s terrible when other religions do it, but okay when Christians do it.”

6dogs9cats:

h/t: Hayes Brown at Think Progress World

Fox’s Dana Loesch wants you to know that despite her heated support for the homophobic Benham brothers, she has friends and family members who are gay. She also wants you to know that her “biggest daily struggle” is “balancing” her conservative activism with “compassion.” If her appearance on The Kelly File Friday night is any guide, I think it’s clear Loesch needs some more work on that “compassion” thing.

As Loesch tells it in her column about her Kelly File nastiness (which seems more the norm than an aberration), all she wants to do is stand up for “sincere people of faith” like the Benham brothers - the rabidly anti-gay, anti-abortion and anti-Muslim realtors whose HGTV reality show got shelved once their activism was revealed. It’s worth pointing out that the Benhams don’t just have extreme right-wing religious opinion, they are political activists about it. Without the kind of Christian tolerance for diversity of opinion Loesch claims to support.

From Media Matters:

On May 6, Right Wing Watch reported that David Benham, who along with his brother Jason was slated to star in a fixer-upper reality show called Flip It Forward, had an extensive record of anti-choice, anti-gay, and anti-Muslim activism. David Benham explained to far-right radio host Janet Mefferd in 2012 that he and his brother had participated in a protest of the Democratic National Convention to take a stand against “homosexuality and its agenda that is attacking the nation,” abortion, divorce, and “demonic ideologies” circulating in the education system. Benham has also compared the anti-gay marriage fight to the struggle against Nazi Germany and highlighted Leviticus’ prescription of death for gay sex.Benham’s views on Muslims are no kinder; he has declared that “Islam takes life and enslaves it” and protested in front of mosques while shouting “Jesus Hates Muslims.”

Yeah, that sounds compassionate and tolerant, eh? Well, apparently it does to Loesch.

On Friday night, Loesch was paired against Democrat Jessica Ehrlich. At least in this segment, Ehrlich was a refreshing change from the nice, bland, go-along-to-get-along Democrats who come off more as Fox News patsies than the political “strategists” they’re billed as. Ehrlich refused to be called an “anti-Christian bigot.” And obviously, Ms. Compassionate could not deal with even a fraction of what she loves to dish out!

Guest host Martha MacCallum had to interrupt the acrimony and end the segment.

Nicely done, Ms. Ehrlich!

Jessica Ehrlich is this week’s hero of the week, while Dana Loesch takes worst person in the world honors. 

See Also: Dana Busted: On The Kelly File, Phony “Christian” Dana Loesch falsely smears Jessica Ehrlich as an “anti-Christian Bigot”

h/t: Ellen at Newshounds.us

Todd Starnes, Fox News’ resident culture warrior, wants to reclaim God for an America of gay pride paraders, hipsters, twerkers, and vegetarians. That, at least, is what he sets out to do in his latest tome, God Less America: Real Stories from the Front Lines of the Attack on Traditional Values.

It’s a book that’s been generously promoted on the Fox News commentator’s network. Starnes’ publicity tour has taken him to such programs as Fox & Friends, HannityThe Kelly File, Fox Business’ Lou Dobbs Tonight, and the radio show of Fox contributor Laura Ingraham.

During his publicity tour for God Less America, Starnes has homed in on a consistent message: religious, specifically Christian, values are under attack, largely thanks to an all-out assault allegedly led by the Obama administration, aided and abetted by LGBT activists and advocates for secularists and adherents to minority faiths. Obama, Starnes asserts, is at the forefront of a conspiracy “to eradicate the Christian faith” from the public square.

But Starnes’ book isn’t really about the state of Christianity in the age of Obama. It’s primarily about Starnes himself, and the cultural resentments that define his worldview. Portraying himself as a down-home Southerner who loves sweet tea (a fact he reminds readers of no fewer than nine times), Duck Dynasty, guns, and his hardline Southern Baptist faith, beneath Starnes’ folksy veneer is a far more venomous culture warrior.

What Starnes repeatedly - if unwittingly - reveals is that he isn’t so much afraid of the impending loss of religious liberty as he is fearful that his exclusionary vision of America no longer holds the sway it once did.

Cultural Chauvinism and Muslim-Baiting

What particularly rouses Starnes’ ire about the state of contemporary America is that it’s led by, as he pointedly notes, “Barack Hussein Obama.” Starnes laments throughout the book that Obama’s America is no longer the one in which in grew up - a country he depicts as more wholesome and unapologetically Christian, when women knew their place and gay people weren’t being as obnoxious with all that equal rights stuff:

I grew up in a much simpler time - when blackberry was a pie and dirty dancing meant somebody forgot to clean out the barn for the square dance. It was a time when father still knew best - when the girls were girls and the men were men. I grew up in a time when a rainbow was a sign of God’s promise, not gay rights.

To Starnes, Obama perfectly symbolizes the fading of that America. For one thing, Starnes not-so-subtly hints that the president has an affinity for Islam - referring to Obama as someone who “professes” to be a Christian, twice assailing him for calling the Muslim call to prayer “one of the prettiest sounds on earth at sunset,” and suggesting that Obama hasn’t secured the release on American pastor detained in Iran because the pastor had left the Islamic faith.

Starnes also lambastes the president for stating that we’re “not just a Christian nation,” but also a nation of Jews, Muslims, Buddhists, Hindus, and secularists. A less paranoid observer might view Obama’s remark as an affirmation of the country’s religious diversity, but Starnes can’t help seeing anti-Christian bias. (Starnes writes that it’s “puzzling” that any “follower of Christ” would make such a statement.”) Likewise, restrictions on proselytization in the military aren’t, say, a sensible response to the harassment of non-Christian believers, but part of a “Christian cleansing” executed by the Obama administration. And just as he did in an appearance on Fox’s Hannity to promote the book, Starnes compares officials enforcing the First Amendment’s establishment clause to Adolf Hitler. “Hitler was not a big fan of the Baby Jesus,” Starnes writes in a chapter titled “Nazis, Communists, and the USA.” “Neither were the Communists. And apparently some American employees and schoolteachers share an equal disdain for the little Lord Jesus.” Starnes is just saying.

Anti-LGBT Bigotry

But the bulk of God Less America is devoted to propping up the defining feature of Starnes’ worldview - his acute persecution complex when it comes to LGBT equality. The longest chapter in the book is bluntly titled “Gay Rights vs. Religious Rights,” but several others focus on LGBT topics like Chick-fil-A, Duck Dynasty, and the Kinky Boots performance at the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. All are meant to reinforce the right-wing myth that any progress towards LGBT equality must come at the expense of liberty for Christians. We’re not far from a day, Starnes predicts, when pastors will be “brought up on charges of hate speech against homosexuals.”

Starnes has made his name on Fox News as the network’s mouthpiece for the country’s most extreme anti-LGBT organizations, including hate groups like the American Family Association (AFA) and the Family Research Council (FRC). His close relationship with those groups is evident in his writing: he cites FRC ten times in the book. The FRC even hosted a launch party for the book at its offices, featuring Starnes and Fox correspondent Shannon Bream:

Starnes also cites the Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF), a group working internationally to criminalize homosexuality, another ten times. These groups are relied on to offer commentary on a number of overblown or outright fabricated horror stories Starnes offers about the movement for LGBT equality. 

When he’s not using scare tactics to warn about basic protections for the LGBT community, Starnes’ discussions of LGBT people are marked by stereotypes as stale as the Southern country boy trope with which he hits readers over the head.  Gay men are Dolce & Gabanna-obsessed, body hair-grooming, sissies who can’t appreciate manly men’s men like Duck Dynasty's Phil Robertson, who notoriously compared homosexuality with bestiality and equated gay people with “drunks” and “terrorists.” According to Starnes, GQ,  the magazine in which Robertson made his infamous remarks, is the kind of publication typically read by “men who prefer body waxing and manicures,” not the Robertsons’ down-home homophobia.

Like Phil, Starnes thinks that the gays could be putting us on a slippery slope to bestiality, writing an entire chapter that envisions a Supreme Court ruling legalizing bestiality by 2025.

Starnes’ transphobia is just as rabid as his homophobia. When discussing transgender people, he misgenders them and suggests - despite all evidence - that transgender people pose public safety dangers if they’re allowed to restrooms that match their gender identities. Such ugly, bigoted remarks make clear that when Starnes complains about how this is no longer the America he grew up in, what he’s really upset about is that it’s an America where long-oppressed groups are beginning to assert their basic rights.

All Grievance, Little Godliness

In his conclusion, Starnes gloomily predicts that “[t]hey” could soon “throw us in jail.” On what grounds? And who are they? It isn’t quite clear. Starnes’ mission is to awaken readers to the danger President Obama and the liberal elite pose to their cherished religious freedoms. All he has to offer, however, are apoplectic condemnations of LGBT equality, religious diversity, and Brooklynites who wear skinny jeans and eat tempeh and take their tea unsweetened. Yet Starnes and his ideological brethren have continued to thrive in Obama’s America - not despite, but because of, a president and a set of ideas they hysterically denounce as grave threats to the American way of life.

Instead of demonstrating how an America that embraces more of its citizens threatens conservatives’ liberties, all Starnes has done instead is illuminate the baseless fear and paranoia that motivate the right wing’s professional culture warriors.

h/t: Luke Brinker at MMFA