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Posts tagged "Corporal Punishment"

h/t: Derek Penton-Robicheaux at The New Civil Rights Movement

Earlier this year, the Maine Supreme Court ruled that local school officials had violated the rights of a transgender student by not allowing her to use the girls’ restroom and Gordon Klingenschmitt was unsurprisingly opposed to this ruling, declaring on his “Pray In Jesus Name” program yesterday that what this student really needed was a spanking and an exorcism.

Noting that Nicole Maines has an identical twin brother, Klingenschmitt declared that she was possessed by a demonic spirit.

"One of those two boys is possessed by a demon," he said, "and the parents are encouraging that and really what the parents ought to do is take that boy to an exorcist, take that boy to a minister or at least discipline the boy, maybe give him a spanking. Maybe dress him like a boy even if he complains and whines and says ‘I don’t wanna wear boys clothes.’ Too bad, son. You’re a boy, you gotta man up":

Speaking of who needs a spanking, it’s you, Mr. Klingenschmitt. 

h/t: Kyle Mantyla at RWW

GREAT News in Missouri. There is a bill being proposed that would make Missouri the 32nd state to ban corporal punishment in schools, both public and private. Let’s hope this bill passes; however, the right-wing [fundie] knuckleheads in the state will try to stop this bill from being passed at all costs. 

Bill link: 
http://legiscan.com/MO/text/SB827/2014

h/t: Alex Stuckey at STLToday.com

thepoliticalfreakshow:

A Kansas lawmaker made headlines last week for introducing a bill to explicitly permit spanking to the point of “redness or bruising” by parents, as well as teachers given permission by parents. The bill almost immediately died in committee, but not before attracting criticism,defense and outright mockery. The discussion was remarkable — not for what was said, but for what remained unaddressed.

Outside the media industry, corporal punishment in school is noncontroversial, as 80% of parents and 72% of Americans believe that it should not be permitted. The South has the highest level of support, a meager 35%. Despite this widespread public opposition, condemnation by pediatric and childcare experts and a growing international abolition movement, school spanking remains legal in 19 states.

This disconnect is relatively new. A 1977 Supreme Court ruling determined that while corporal punishment violated the Eighth Amendment’s prohibition against “cruel and unusual punishment,” the clause did not apply to students. Under the majority’s logic, criminals could not receive corporal punishment, but students could — even without their parent’s permission.

The ruling and shifting public opinion prompted state legislation. From 1977 to 1997, 24 states banned corporal punishment in schools. But the pace of change has slowed in recent decades. Since 1997, only five bans have passed. Sometime in the 2000s, legislation and public opinion became out of step.

The explanation may lie in who receives corporal punishment. The most recent Department of Education statistics show that around 216,000 students received corporal punishment in 2009, only a slight decrease from the prior study (223,000 in 2006). The number is high, but it’s far from evenly distributed.

Urban districts often have local bans, so that the majority of school spanking is carried out in rural areas. Disabled students are spanked at a disproportionately high level, despite research suggesting that those with mental handicaps are least capable of understanding why they are being punished. Minorities are also punished at a higher rate. In a particularly egregious example, the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction found that while Native American students constituted only 2% of students, they received 35% of the state’s corporal punishment. Across all races, about 80% of those punished are boys. The number of non-disabled white women spanked in the United States in 2009 was considered statistically insignificant by the Department of Education.

The disproportionate effect of these policies on minority and disabled students in rural districts could help explain how school spanking remains in place despite majority opposition. More privileged students with more privileged parents (including the 10% with students in private school) are rarely effected and thus unlikely to give the issue much thought. Those most passionate about changing these policies may lack the political power to influence the legislative or media agenda.

Whatever the cause, school spanking remains lawful in 19 states over the opposition of 80% of American parents, the American Medical Association, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Psychiatric Association, the American Psychological Association, the National Education Association, the American Civil Liberties Union, Human Rights Watch, the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child and many others. The next time corporal punishment in schools enters the news cycle, think of the issue not as a controversydebate or discussion, but a continuing and pernicious failure of American-style democracy.

thepoliticalfreakshow:

A Democratic lawmaker in Kansas says that her bill allowing teachers, caregivers and parents to beat children to point of leaving bruises is about restoring parental rights, not abusing children.

State Rep. Gail Finney’s (D) bill expands current law, which allows spanking without leaving marks.

According to KCTV, the new legislation would permit teachers, caregivers and parents to strike children up to 10 times, and leave redness or even bruising.

McPherson Deputy County Attorney Britt Colle, who proposed the idea to Finney, told KCTV that the measure actually protected children by defining what parents were not allowed to do.

“This bill basically defines a spanking along with necessary reasonable physical restraint that goes with discipline, all of which has always been legal,” Colle explained. “This bill clarifies what parents can and cannot do. By defining what is legal, it also defines what is not.”

Colle said that the new rules would not allow children to be hit in the head or the body. Using a fist or a switch or a belt would also be against the rules.

But not everyone in Kansas thinks that turning back the clock on child beatings is a great idea.

“Twenty, 30 years ago, we didn’t sit in car seats, and we do now,” pediatric nurse practitioner and child care expert Amy Terreros pointed out. “So maybe they did spank or were spanked as a child, but now we have research that shows it is less effective than time out. It tends to lead to more aggressive behavior with a child.”

If the bill passes, Kansas will be one of the few states to expand spanking rights. Corporal punishment has been banned completely by 30 states.

Finney has vowed to reintroduce the bill next session if House Corrections Committee Chairman John Rubin refuses to bring it up this year.

Watch the video below from KCTV, broadcast Feb. 18, 2014.

KCTV5

(Cross-Posted from Daily Kos
dailykos

(via Daily Kos: AFA Radio host Bryan Fischer supports allowing corporal punishment in schools)

Ahh. AFA Radio host Bryan Fischer is on a roll of stupidity, and on today’s edition of Focal Point, he strongly defended spanking as an “effective discipline method for children,” when reputableresearch on this subject shows it’s the exact opposite.

He also trotted out the lie that the lack of corporal punishment in schools (even in the 19 states that still permit this practice) is causing the quality of education to drop and behavior problems to rise.

Right Wing Watch:

Bryan Fischer spent a large portion of his radio program today hailing the effectiveness of spanking as a biblically-approved form of discipline and cackling as he recounted how he and his wife used a wooden spoon to spank their own children on their bare bottoms because “the bottom is just designed by God for that.”

Eventually, Fischer got around to calling for the use of corporal punishment in public schools, saying failure to allow teachers to physically discipline children is why there are so many behavioral problems in school and why children today are getting such a poor education.

RedState creator and newly minted Fixed Noise “Contributor” Erick Erickson goes even further down the hole of asshattery.

The offense: On twitter, he defended the employee who spanked an 8-year old child at least 25+ times over throwing a cookie at her at a Dollar General Store in Wrightsville, Georgia.

Erick Erickson (@EWErickson) defends a Dollar General employee spanking an 8-year old child.

WXIA (11Alive), Atlanta’s NBC affiliate:

WRIGHTSVILLE, Ga. — A Dollar General employee arrested in Wrightsville last week for hitting a child with a belt has now been charged with aggravated assault. The charges were upgraded from simple battery because store video showed the woman hitting the 8 year old at least 25 times.

"It was more or less a beating than a spanking the way she was hitting him," said Logan Ivey’s father Jody. "I don’t know how to explain it, and I don’t want to think about it."

Eight-year-old Logan said it was very painful.

"I felt like I had five needles sticking in me; it really hurt, I was screaming ‘Momma,’" he said. "And I was crying real bad because she had actually hurt me…when she stopped whipping me my pants were actually a little bit warm."

Wrightsville Police Chief Paul Sterling said Logan Ivey was running around in the store and got into a confrontation with 39-year-old store clerk Emilia Graciela Bell. Bell told investigators the boy threw a cookie at her and that’s when she removed her belt, chased the boy down and spanked him behind the counter.

Media Matters

Fox News contributor Erick Erickson wrote that a Dollar General employee deserves “a medal” for reportedly responding to an eight-year-old child who threw a cookie at her by hitting the child with her belt dozens of times.

Erickson has a long history of using his Twitter feed to engage in inflammatory commentary.

(cross-posted from Daily Kos)

Gun Owners of America head Larry Pratt went back on VCY America’s Crosstalk, where he last month insisted that the health care reform law was meant to “take away your guns,” to talk to host Jim Schneider about the school shooting in Newtown, Connecticut.

Pratt agreed with a caller who said that drugs such as Prozac were leading people to kill and another caller wondered if drugs are “raising a bunch of Manchurian candidates.” A man purporting to be Lanza’s uncle had claimed that he was using an antipsychotic drug, Fanapt, but the “uncle” turned out to be an imposter.

Just as many other right-wing commentators blamed the Newtown massacre on the public school system, even though Lanza was homeschooled, Pratt suggested that corporal punishment, along with the arming of teachers, would ensure that schools aren’t “death traps for kids.”

After warning against government “confiscation” of firearms, Pratt floated debunkedconspiracy theories about the Social Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security purchasing ammunition for nefarious reasons and maintained that all policing on the federal level is unconstitutional.

h/t: Right Wing Watch

The map of states allowing corporal punishment in schools mirrors a map of the states that Mitt Romney won almost exactly. States that bar teachers and administrators from physically disciplining children — which are also the most educated states — all voted for President Obama.

Facts about school corporal punishment and the 2012 elections:
Obama won, corporal punishment in schools allowed: Colorado, Florida.
Obama won, corporal punishment in schools banned: All states except Colorado and Florida.

Romney won, corporal punishment in schools allowed: All states except Alaska, Utah, Nebraska, North Dakota, Montana, South Dakota, and West Virginia.
Romney won, corporal punishment in schools banned: Alaska, Utah, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and West Virginia.

Mitt Romney is a man of many pledges. He’s pledged to sign a constitutional amendment banning gay marriage. He’s pledged to appoint a presidential commission to investigate the intimidation of gay marriage foes. He’s pledged to “look at every government program and ask this question: Is this so critical that it’s worth borrowing money from China to pay for it?” But over the last few weeks, as he’s tried to move to the center and reneged on many of his most contentious past promises, there is one pledge he hasn’t backed away from. It involves spanking.

In July, the GOP presidential nominee wrote a letter to Virginia conservative activist Michael Farris, an evangelical power broker in the critical swing state, outlining his opposition to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, which commits ratifying nations to protect children from discrimination. “My position on that convention is unequivocal: I would oppose Senate approval of the convention, and would not sign the convention for final ratification,” Romney wrote. “I believe that the best safeguard for the well-being and protection of children is the family, and that the primary safeguards for the legal rights of children in America is the U.S. Constitution and the laws of the states.”

The UN CRC hasn’t received much mainstream attention, but it’s becoming a rallying cry on the far right, mostly because social conservatives fear that its passage would imperil the rights of parents to, among other things, use corporal punishment on their kids. The first bullet point in Farris’ 2009 fact sheet explaining his beef with the treaty warned that “[p]arents would no longer be able to administer reasonable spankings to their children.” (The second was that juveniles could no longer be sentenced to life in prison.) Thanks to the efforts of Farris and others, at least 37 GOP senators have announced their opposition to the treaty.

The fear of a national spanking ban extends beyond the realm of international law. When the Supreme Court upheld most portions of the Affordable Care Act, Farris fretted that “Congress can regulate every aspect of our lives so long as there is a tax involved. Congress can ban spanking by enacting a $1,000 tax on those who do. Congress can ban homeschooling in a similar fashion.”

Since that time, however, Somalia has signaled its intent on approving the CRC. Should newly minted nation South Sudan follow suit, the United States will be an exceptional nation once more.

h/t: Tim Murphy at Mother Jones

Yet another reason to abolish corporal punishment in schools.

Texas spanking: High school district expands corporal punishment (via The Christian Science Monitor)

  Like many schools in Texas, “spare the rod and spoil the child” might be considered the motto at Springtown High School. But when two teenage girls there reportedly suffered bruises after being paddled by male assistant principals, some parents complained. They weren’t upset about the punishment itself, but instead that the school violated the policy requiring an educator of the same sex as the student to dole out the paddling. So the school district has changed its policy – to expand, not abolish, corporal punishment. Board members voted Monday night to let administrators paddle students of the opposite sex, after Superintendent Michael Kelley cited a lack of women administrators to carry out spankings. The new policy says a same-gender school official must witness the paddling, which is just one “swat.” In all cases, a parent must give written permission and request it in lieu of another punishment, such as suspension or detention.


 

Here’s a look at the five most outrageous beliefs Texas Republicans hold:

1) The party opposes almost all forms of taxation: The Texas GOP supports “repeal of the Sixteenth Amendment,” which instituted a national income tax, and instead favors awildly regressivenational sales tax that would hit low- and middle-income Americans hardest. It also favors making the Bush tax cuts permanent and repealing the capital gains tax and the estate tax, the latter of which it claims is “immoral and should be abolished forever.” On the state level, it supports abolishing property and business taxes, and property taxes on inventory, and opposes efforts to institute a state income tax, an Internet sales tax, professional licensing fees, and taxes on real estate transactions. Instead, it supports “shifting the tax burden to a consumption-based tax.”

2) It supports returning to the gold standard: “We support the return to the time tested precious metal standard for the U.S. dollar,” the platform states, echoing Rep. Ron Paul (R), the state’s eccentric congressman and presidential candidate. While returning to “sound money,” as the platform calls it, is popular among far right-wing conservatives, it is “not feasiblefor practical and policy reasons,” according to Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke. Most economists agree that the gold standardnever workedand that returning to it now would havedisastrous consequencesfor the American economy.

3) It supports privatizing Social Security: Given that Texas Gov. Rick Perry (R) called Social Security a “Ponzi scheme” during his ill-fated presidential campaign, it may be no surprise that the Texas GOP opposes one of the nation’s most successful federal programs. “We support an immediate and orderly transition to a system of private pensions based on the concept of individual retirement accounts, and gradually phasing out the Social Security tax,” the platform says, ignoring that had such a plan been enacted prior to the Great Recession, it would have cost an October 2008 retireetens of thousands of dollars(and that was before the market bottomed out in 2009). Millions of Americans lost everything in private accounts during the recession, and Social Security wasall they had left.

4) It opposes multicultural education and “critical thinking”: “We believe the current teaching of a multicultural curriculum is divisive,” the platform says, adding that it supports teaching “common American identity and loyalty instead of political correctness that nurtures alienation among racial and ethnic groups.” In Arizona, where Republicansbanned multicultural programs, students in those programs actuallyout-performed their peers. Texas Republicans also believe “controversial theories” such evolution and climate change — whicharen’tcontroversialat all — “should be taught as challengeable scientific theories subject to change as new data is produced.” There’s more: the GOP also opposes the teaching of “critical thinking skills” because they “focus on behavior modification and have the purpose of challenging the student’s fixed beliefs and undermining parental authority.”

5) It supports corporal punishment in schools: “Corporal punishment is effective and legal in Texas,” the platform states, adding that teachers and school boards should be given “more authority to deal with disciplinary problems.” Actual research, however, shows that corporal punishment is bad for children and their education. Research shows that corporal punishment is “associated with an increase in delinquency, antisocial behavior, and aggression in children,” according to the American Psychoanalytic Association, which “strongly condemns” the use of such punishment. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that parents and schools use other forms of punishment because “corporal punishment is of limited effectiveness and has potentially deleterious side effects.”

h/t: Travis Waldron at Think Progress Economy

As the old saying goes, history repeats itself, first as tragedy, then as the Republican Party of Iowa.

Via Felicia Sonmez, it looks like the Iowa GOP has gone birther. On Monday, Don Racheter, chairman of the Iowa GOP’s 2012 platform committee, told Radio Iowa’s O. Kay Henderson about the state party’s new platform. Racheter said the document, which is still being drafted, was deliberately written to call into question President Barack Obama’s eligibility for office by including a plank mandating that the commander-in-chief be a “natural born citizen”:

There are many Republicans who feel that Barack Obama is not a ‘natural born citizen’ because his father was not an American when he was born and, therefore, feel that according to the Constitution he’s not qualified to be president, should not have been allowed to be elected by the Electoral College or even nominated by the Democratic Party in 2008, so this is an election year. It’s a shot at him

The rest of the Iowa GOP’s platform is itself a somewhat spectacular document. The platform says much about the tone and tenor of the conservative grassroots five-and-a-half months out from election day. It advocates nullification of federal laws, the abolition of 10 cabinet-level departments (plus the TSA, FDA, ATF, Fannie Mae, and Freddie Mac), an end to birthright citizenship, and “the implementation of Lean Six Sigma" at all levels of government. It calls for the rejection of "UN Treaty on the Rights of the Child" (which social conservatives fear will curtail the perfectly justified practice of spanking), aims for the term "assault weapon" to be redefined as something other than a semi-automatic weapon, and asserts that "all individuals have the freedom to choose the quality of air in their home." The "so-called ‘NAFTA Superhighway’"—which doesn’t exist—should be scuttled. There are 14 different planks pertaining to the United Nations and the North American Union, most notably the pro-sustainability Agenda 21 pact, which the Iowa GOP considers “diabolical.”

h/t: Tim Murphy at Mother Jones

In 2007, we ran a devastating exposé of the Judge Rotenberg Center, a “school” that took mentally and psychologically troubled kids from across the country and treated them by hooking them up to electrodes and shocking them whenever they misbehaved or displayed symptoms of their disorders, like autism. Reports from former students and staff were horrific, and Jennifer Gonnerman’s extensive reporting helped launch or fortify state and local investigations in the school, and its founder Matthew Israel. Yet despite the investigations and ongoing lawsuits, the school managed to stay open open.

Last month the school was targeted by Anonymous, which released a video condemning the “torture” of its students. But the video that may truly take down Rotenberg for good is below.


Graphic video of teen being restrained, shocked played in court: MyFoxBOSTON.com

H/T: Clara Jeffery at Mother Jones

See Also: School Of Shock (via Mother Jones) 

More coverage on JRC on Mother Jones