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Posts tagged "Eric Cantor"

crooksandliars:

Rep. Tom Price: Obama -- Not The GOP -- Is The 'Largest Opponent Of Immigration Reform'

Rep. Tom Price (R-GA) asserted on Sunday that Congress had not passed comprehensive immigration reform because its “largest opponent” was President Barack Obama.

In an interview on Fox News, Price defended Republicans who were insisting that the party replace House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) with someone who opposed immigration reform after he lost his primary last week.

Fox News host Chris Wallace reminded Price that former Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney had lost to Obama by 44 points among Hispanic voters in 2012.

"Don’t you have to do something to appeal more?" Wallace wondered. "And immigration is certainly one of the things that Hispanics care about. Don’t you have to do something if you’re going to avoid getting in real trouble at the ballot box in 2014, and especially 2016?"

Price agreed that the immigration system was broken, but argued “that it is the president that is the largest opponent to immigration reform.”

"It was Mitt Romney who lost among Hispanics, sir," Wallace noted.

"That doesn’t negate the fact that President Obama in 2011 who said the border is secure," Price insisted. "The president was being deceitful with the American people on this."

"What did he do this weekend to correct that?" the Georgia Republican continued. "He went and gave a hyper-partisan commencement speech, and then went and played golf. That’s the frustration that my constituents have. This is a president who is disengaged on solving this challenge of immigration."

read more

crooksandliars:

Mr. 'Government Shutdown' Cantor Blames Economic Woes On Obama

I don’t know about anyone else, but I think the man personally responsible for making sure that the Democrats could not pass a discharge petition to reopen the government after Republicans shut it down — a shutdown that cost the economy $24 billion, did great damage to our businesses, and whose party has cost our economy at least 750,000 jobs with threats of default — is the last person who should be attacking anyone else for the shape our economy is in.

read more

h/t: Sahil Kapur at TPM

thepoliticalfreakshow:

“I want a House Leadership team that reflects the best of our conference. A leadership team that can bring the Republican conference together,” Labrador, first elected to the House in 2010, said. “A leadership team that can help unite and grow our party. Americans don’t believe their leaders in Washington are listening and now is the time to change that.”

Labrador’s entrance adds some competition to the race after some McCarthy challengers either declined a run (Rep. Jeb Hensarling) or abandoned one (Rep. Pete Sessions).

He has been pushed as a McCarthy alternative by tea party members like Justin Amash (R-MI) and outside conservative groups like FreedomWorks.

Source: Dylan Scott for Talking Points Memo

thepoliticalfreakshow:

Former rock star and political gadfly Ted Nugent celebrated House Majority Leader Eric Cantor’s primary loss to Tea Party candidate David Brat, comparing the GOP’s only Jewish congressional member to Nazi propagandist Joseph Goebbels.

Writing for ‘birther’ conspiracy website World Net Daily, Nugent urged readers “Let’s go ‘Eric Cantor’ on them all!,” by throwing out politicians who indulge in “Joseph Goebbels and Saul Alinsky smoke-and-mirrors politics.”

“I say we the people have had way more than enough compromise, backpedaling, Joseph Goebbels and Saul Alinsky smoke-and-mirrors politics for one generation, and I say it’s about time we go Eric Cantor on the whole gang of deceivers and liars infesting our government right now,” he wrote. ” There’s only so much decent people can take.”

Nugent is no stranger to using Nazi imagery to make a political point, having recently come under fire for calling President Barack Obama a “subhuman mongrel,” a term favored by Der Stürmer publisher Julius Streicher who wrote: ‘The Jew is a mongrel. He has hereditary tendencies from Aryans, Asiatics, Negroes, and from the Mongolians. Evil always preponderates in the case of a mongrel.”

Nugent later made a roundabout apology for using Nazi rhetoric, without acknowledging it’s history, instead calling it “street fighter terminology.”

Previously Nugent called members of the Department of Justice, “jack boot Nazi motherf*ckers,” and animal rights supporters, “”f*cking retarded mongrels.”

cnmnewz:

Sean Hannity defends guest who tells Republicans to ‘stop chasing genitalia’

Fox News host Sean Hannity quickly covered for conservative radio host Mark Levin on Tuesday after Levin used coarse language to urge Republicans not to make inroads with women or communities of color.

“Stop chasing ethnic groups, stop chasing genitalia,” Levin told Hannity. “Talk to the American people. Talk about liberty, opportunity. Explain to them that [President Barack] Obama’s wrong, and that we need to unleash the American people and unleash the economy.”

“You might be making news with that ‘genitalia’ remark,” Hannity responded. “But those that don’t know you don’t know your sense of humor.”

The “joke” appeared to be a rebuke to recent GOP efforts to avoid making themselves look intolerant,particularly regarding issues related to immigration and african-american voters. The party has also been accused of conducting a “war on women” due to its consistently conservative — at times radical — views opposing reproductive health rights.

Hannity noted that Levin was one of several radio personalities who supported Tea Party challenger Dave Brat’s upset win over House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) in the Republican primary for Virginia’s 7th congressional district earlier in the day. Brat’s campaign facebook page features pictures of not only Levin, but Glenn Beck, Ann Coulter, and Laura Ingraham, among others.

The page also contains pictures of former President Ronald Reagan, and both Hannity and Levin compared Brat’s win to Reagan’s winning the support of the “Moral Majority” movement as he rose to the top of the GOP in 1980.

“People are yearning for a leader,” Levin told Hannity. “They do not like the status quo, whether it’s defended by Republicans or Democrats.”

Levin then accused the Chamber of Commerce, House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) of marginalizing other conservatives.

“This isn’t a joke to the American people,” he said. “This is their future. And we see the country slipping away — at least, the kind of country that we want — and why is it so hard for these guys to articulate our principles? They talk about Reagan, but they’re rockefeller republicans.

Earlier this year, Levin said on his radio show that marriage equality “affects society” in a way similar to incest. Last year, he also called for “cockroaches” to be purged from the Republican Party.

Watch the interview between Levin and Hannity, as posted on tuesday by media matters, below.

Just days after Rep. Eric Cantor was ousted in a Republican primary, right-wing media are outraged at the ideological credentials of his likely replacement as House majority leader. Conservatives are calling Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) “dimwitted,” “pro-amnesty,” and “just another in a long line of big spenders who thinks the Democrats in charge of government are the problem, not government itself.”

The Washington Post reported that McCarthy is the “overwhelming front-runner” to be the majority leader after he “appeared to have consolidated ranks in almost every corner of the House GOP caucus and seemed well positioned to win next week’s snap election to succeed Rep. Eric Cantor.” The Los Angeles Times similarlyreported McCarthy “is all but assured of becoming the next House majority leader.”  

Cantor has endorsed his “dear friend” McCarthy, stating: “He’d make an outstanding majority leader, and I will be backing him with my full support.”

But the prospect of McCarthy replacing Cantor has drawn strong condemnation from conservative pundits, including radio hosts Mark Levin and Laura Ingraham, who campaigned against Cantor.

On his June 10 broadcast, radio host Mark Levin said Republicans need “a conservative in that slot, not that dimwitted McCarthy.” On June 12, Levin said that McCarthy has positions that “are identical to Cantor’s and Boehner’s. He’s a moderate Republican, he’s pro-amnesty. He was the Republican whip. Do you know what the Republican whip means? It means whip them into line. Whip the votes into line. He not only went along with [House Speaker John] Boehner and Cantor on all these issues, but he was the enforcer.” Levin also tweeted, “House GOP learned nothing from Cantor defeat; pushing disastrous McCarthy for majority leader.”

Fox News contributor Laura Ingraham said on the June 11 edition of Fox & Friends that McCarthy is “kind of joined at the hip” with Cantor and Boehner on immigration reform. She added that if “they put Kevin McCarthy in there, I think they’re creating more problems for themselves.” On her radio show on June 12, Ingraham said McCarthy “is more out there on immigration reform, I think, coming from California too, than Eric Cantor was. So if you loved Eric Cantor, you’re going to just — you’re going to have a man crush on Kevin McCarthy. That’s going to work out really well for us.”

Erick Erickson wrote a June 11 RedState post headlined, “Not McCarthy.” The Fox News contributor wrote that “McCarthy is not very conservative and, for all of Cantor’s faults, lacks Cantor’s intelligence on a number of issues. Lest we forget, McCarthy had several high profile screw ups as Whip and has not really seemed to ever improve over time.” In another post called “The Stupid Party,” Erickson wrote that McCarthy “is just another in a long line of big spenders who thinks the Democrats in charge of government are the problem, not government itself.”

The Washington Examiner’s Philip Klein wrote that if “Republicans respond to the shocking primary defeat of Majority Leader Rep. Eric Cantor, R-Va., by elevating his handpicked successor Rep. Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., it would be beyond tone-deaf. It would be pure absurdity.” Klein went on to complain that McCarthy “voted for a Hurricane Sandy relief bill that included spending that was unrelated to providing emergency aid, fought for the farm and food stamp bill, fought reforms to the federal sugar program, and backed an extension of the corporate welfare agency known as the Export-Import Bank.”

Media Research Center vice president Dan Gainor tweeted that “GOP picking McCarthy shows DC elites are not serious about listening to grassroots. They need to lose more elections” and ”#GOP desperate to lose base by backing McCarthy. #tonedeaf.”

Conservative blogger Jim Hoft tweeted on June 11: “Death Knell: @EricCantor says he will support Kevin McCarthy for Majority Leader - No Thanks.” 

H/t: Eric Hananoki at MMFA

H/T: Brian Tashman at RWW

h/t: Brian Tashman at RWW

thepoliticalfreakshow:

WASHINGTON — Representative Eric Cantor of Virginia, the No. 2 House Republican, will resign his leadership position within weeks, according to leadership aides. The move follows a stunning defeat in a primary election Tuesday in which voters rejected him in favor of a more conservative candidate.

The move culminated a precipitous fall for Mr. Cantor, who was thought to be a likely successor to Speaker John A. Boehner.

By stepping down as majority leader, an aide to Mr. Cantor said, he hoped to limit a festering struggle within the House Republican caucus over who would assume his post.

Mr. Cantor attended a meeting with other members of the leadership Wednesday morning in advance of a larger meeting of Republican members set for 4 p.m. He definitively told aides and other Republican leaders that he would not mount a write-in campaign this fall against the Tea Party candidate, David Brat, who defeated him soundly in the Virginia Republican primary.

He declared, “To run a write-in campaign is to run not as a Republican, and I am a Republican,” according to witnesses who were at an extended leadership meeting in the Capitol.

Continue reading the main story

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Where Eric Cantor Won and Lost

Map of the results and charts of his margins in previous elections.

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Top House Republicans called a 4 p.m. meeting of all Republican members as the scramble to remake the Republican leadership swung into high gear just hours after Mr. Cantor’s surprise defeat. Representative Kevin McCarthy of California, the No. 3 Republican, made it clear he will seek Mr. Cantor’s soon-to-be-vacant No. 2 slot. But he will be challenged by Representative Pete Sessions of Texas, the House Rules Committee chairman.

Representative Peter Roskam of Illinois, Mr. McCarthy’s chief deputy whip, will square off against Representative Steve Scalise of Louisiana, head of the conservative Republican Study Committee, for Mr. McCarthy’s House majority whip position.

But other wild cards are looming. Representative Jeb Hensarling of Texas, publicly thanked House colleagues for encouraging him to join the leadership race.

“There are many ways to advance the causes of freedom and free enterprise, and I am prayerfully considering the best way I can serve in those efforts,” he said.

Other potential challengers include Representatives Tom Price and Tom Graves of Georgia.

The contest between Mr. McCarthy and Mr. Sessions will tug hard at the Tea Party class of 2010.

Mr. Sessions headed the National Republican Congressional Committee the year of the Tea Party wave, and he enters the leadership race with the large Texas delegation behind him.

But Mr. McCarthy headed candidate recruitment in 2010. He pushed to expand the electoral map into long-held Democratic districts, pursued unusual candidates that he believed fit the newly drawn districts of 2010, and crisscrossed the country on their behalf. He also brings his own large whip operation to the race to counter the Texans.

House Republicans said the longer the fights fester below the surface, the more chance the campaigns could turn ugly and spread, sweeping in other targets, even Speaker John A. Boehner. One senior House Republican said, the party “can’t have a leadership race muddle all that we do until the November election,” and he encouraged leaders to make sure the races wrap up before the July 4 recess.

Another member said the faster the races can be run, the better the chance Mr. McCarthy has to become majority leader – and Mr. Cantor wants to smooth his advance. Otherwise, he added, “chaos could rein.”

CBS This Morning hosted its political analyst Frank Luntz to discuss House Majority Leader Eric Cantor’s Republican primary loss to Dave Brat. An upset Luntz said that Cantor’s defeat was “a great loss not just for Virginia, but for the country.” But at no point did CBS News or Luntz disclose a major conflict of interest: Cantor has paid Luntz’s firm thousands of dollars for consulting.

Frank Luntz is the CEO of the political consulting firm Luntz Global (Luntz sold his majority stake in the company in January, but continues to serve as an executive). According to documents filed with the Federal Election Commission, Luntz Global has received over $15,000 in consulting fees since 2012 from Cantor for Congress: On February 27, Cantor paid Luntz Global $2,353 for “seminar expenses”; on December 12, Cantor paid Luntz Global $5,000 for “speech consulting”; on April 9, 2012, Cantor paid Luntz Global $8,000 for “speech writing.”

CBS This Morning hosts Norah O’Donnell and Charlie Rose did not note the CBS News political analyst’s financial connections to Cantor. Luntz hailed Cantor as a hero to the country whose loss shatters the “cooperation” between House Republicans and the White House. From the June 11 edition of CBS’ CBS This Morning

LUNTZ: Well you had Eric Cantor, who had a very good relationship with Joe Biden. Had open lines of communication. I think for the GOP it’s going to be very dangerous now for a Republican to talk to Democrats, as it was Democrats to talk to Republicans a few years ago. That this a blow for conversation. This is a blow for some sort of cooperation and I think it’s bad for the country, not just bad for the Republicans.

[…]

LUNTZ: I think this is such a great loss not just for Virginia, but for the country. Eric Cantor had the ability to negotiate. Eric Cantor had the ability to sit toe to toe and make concessions and make agreements. And maybe that hurt him in the primary, but that’s exactly what we need in Washington, and now we’re losing him.

After Rose noted Cantor “was a pipeline to Wall Street too in raising money,” Luntz replied, “He was also a pipeline to Americans who just wanted people to get things done. And we’ve lost that leadership in Washington.” 

In his book Do Not Ask What Good We Do: Inside the U.S. House of Representatives, Robert Draper reported that Luntz orchestrated a 2009 meeting where prominent Republicans, including Eric Cantor, formulated a plan to win back Congress and the White House. He wrote: “Luntz had organized the dinner — telling the invitees, ‘You’ll have nothing to do that night, and right now we don’t matter anyway, so let’s all be irrelevant together.’ He had selected these men because they were among the Republican Party’s most energetic thinkers — and because they all got along with Luntz, who could be difficult.”  

CBS News has repeatedly had disclosure problems with Luntz, who was hired by the network in 2012. When it first began hosting him, CBS couldn’t decide whether Luntz was an active Republican or a “former Republican” pollster and strategist (he’s active). Luntz also appeared on CBS during the 2012 campaign to discuss Republican vice presidential candidate and Rep. Paul Ryan without disclosing Luntz Global received money from Ryan’s congressional campaign.

Luntz’s lack of disclosure may violate CBS Corporation’s standards of conduct. The CBS Corporation Business Conduct Statement on conflicts of interest informs CBS employees, “including those employed on a temporary, freelance, intern, or per diem basis,” that “in all cases” they “must disclose all potential conflicts of interest” to CBS. 

H/T: Eric Hananoki at MMFA

Dark Horse candidates that I’d also wager: Tim Huelskamp, Marsha Blackburn, Todd Rokita, and/or Jim Bridenstine could be considered for leadership roles. 
h/t: Lauren French and John Bresnahan at Politico

thepoliticalfreakshow:

No one thought Eric Cantor, the House majority leader, could actually lose. His primary challenge in his suburban Richmond district, from a local economics professor named David Brat, was thought to be nominal. No sitting majority leader has lost a primary since the position was invented in 1899. Cantor, though unloved by many in his party and in Congress, was seen as the speaker-in-waiting whenever John Boehner decided, or was forced, to hang it up.

But all those assumptions went out the window Tuesday night, when Cantor shockingly lost—and by a wide margin. With 97 percent of the vote counted, Brat had 56 percent of the vote to Cantor’s 44 percent.

In retrospect, there were signs Cantor felt endangered. As the Washington Postreported, in a dispatch that seemed far-fetched at the time but now appears prescient, Cantor was booed at a local Republican gathering last month, and his handpicked candidate for district GOP chair was defeated. His campaign aired TV ads and sent mailers crediting him for blocking immigration reform—signs he had begun to sense a threat. Meanwhile, Brat, a Tea Party activist, was championed by national conservatives like Ann Coulter and Mark Levin. (According to Virginia’s “sore-loser” law, Cantor can’t run against Brat as an independent in the general election, though he might be allowed to mount a write-in bid.)

One immigration-reform-supporting conservative operative emailed me mournfully: “I can’t vote for Democrats because I am pro-life, but my party seems beyond repair.” 

Cantor’s loss will prompt the reexamination of some other pieces of conventional wisdom: One, that the Tea Party is dead—clearly, at least in one restive precinct, anti-Washington anger is alive and well. And two, that supporting immigration reform doesn’t necessarily hurt Republicans in primaries—Cantor’s supposed support for “amnesty” was Brat’s chief line of attack. Supporters of immigration reform now fear that Republican members of Congress, leery of touching the issue before, now will never be persuaded that it is not politically toxic. As one immigration-reform-supporting conservative operative emailed me mournfully: “I can’t vote for Democrats because I am pro-life, but my party seems beyond repair.” 

In truth, it’s not quite so simple. The Tea Party has come up short in most of the big races where it played this year, and other, unapologetic Republican supporters of immigration reform, like North Carolina Representative Renee Ellmers and South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham, have held on in the face of primary challenges. Cantor may have suffered more for his role as part of the unpopular House leadership than for any particular issue. After Republicans took the House in 2010, Cantor positioned himself as conservatives’ voice in leadership, a role in which he was blamed for scuttling the 2011 debt-limit deal that led to the nation’s credit being downgraded. But he had since patched things up with Boehner, a turnaround that led many House Republicans in both camps—the hard right and the establishment—to be unsure they could trust him. Cantor was ambitious, perpetually billed as a “rising star” despite his seven terms in Congress, but his ideas, like his “Making Life Work” reform agenda, never seemed to gain traction within his party.

There are few real surprises in politics. Tuesday’s result in Richmond was a rare exception. The political world now must get to know an obscure Randolph-Macon professor named Dave Brat; his Democratic opponent, an even more obscure professor at the same college named Jack Trammell; and a new world order in the House of Representatives.

Conservative radio host and ABC News contributor Laura Ingraham made good on her promise to primary any Republican candidate who didn’t share her anti-immigrant views, actively campaigning against House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) by endorsing his victorious opponent Dave Brat and making appearances at rallies to support him.

Cantor Loses To Challenger Dave Brat In VA Primary Upset

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor Loses In Primary To Dave Brat. On the night of June 10, Rep. Cantor lost in the Republican primary to his conservative challenger Dave Brat, widely considered a longshot to win the race:

Meet Dave Brat, an economics and ethics professor at Randolph-Macon College in Ashland, Virginia, who launched a long-shot — and ultimately successful — bid to oust House Majority Leader Eric Cantor from his seat representing Virginia’s 7th Congressional District.

Brat, who admits that he has supported several Cantor candidacies over the years, says he mounted his improbable primary campaign because the House GOP’s No. 2 leader has lost touch with his constituents, “veering from the Republican creed.”

"Years ago he had a good conservative track record, but now he’s veered off," Brat told ABC News during an interview on Capitol Hill in May. "If you go to Heritage and look at their score, I think he’s at about a 53 right now. I mean, that’s an F-minus." [ABC News, 6/10/14]

Brat Attacked Cantor’s Views On Immigration In Campaign. The Wall Street Journal reported that Brat “has repeatedly accused [Cantor] of supporting amnesty for people in the U.S. illegally”:

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, who goes before GOP primary voters on Tuesday, has faced a sharp attack from his underfunded opponent, who has repeatedly accused him of supporting amnesty for people in the U.S. illegally.

[…]

Back home, Mr. Cantor has responded to the attacks by emphasizing his opposition to “amnesty,” while also making sure that no pro-immigration legislation reaches the House floor, at least for the moment.

It was somewhat unexpected, mostly because Mr. Cantor is not exactly a champion for an immigration overhaul. He says he supports citizenship for young people brought to the U.S. illegally as children, but he has yet to introduce much less schedule a vote on this idea. He personally blocked a vote this spring on an amendment to a defense policy bill that would let young illegal immigrants brought to the country by their parents earn green cards by serving in the military. And when he put his agenda out for House action in June, immigration was conspicuously absent.

Still, Mr. Brat has attacked him relentlessly on the issue. [The Wall Street Journal6/9/14]

Ingraham Blasted Republicans For Supporting Any Pathway To Citizenship

Ingraham: Republican Politicians Supporting “Special Pathway” For Undocumented Immigrants ”Are In Violation Of Their Oath Of Office.” During a discussion with Rep. Jack Kingston (R-GA) on the February 4, 2014 edition of her radio show, Ingraham told him that “we don’t want any bill,” adding:

INGRAHAM: As far as I can tell, any Republican who stands up and says ”We are going to give a special pathway to the people who are here illegally” are in violation of their oath of office. That is my take on it. And I think we have millions of people across the country who are ready to throw all of you out of office unless you stand up for the American worker. [Courtside Entertainment Group, The Laura Ingraham Show2/4/14, via Media Matters]

Ingraham Advised Boehner To Step Away From Immigration Reform “Trap.” On the July 10, 2013 broadcast of her radio show, Ingraham likened immigration reform to a “trap” and stated that she was pressuring Boehner to make sure that he ultimately “walk[ed] away from this trap set” by congressional Democrats and other immigration reform supporters. [Courtside Entertainment Group, The Laura Ingraham Show, 7/10/13

Ingraham: Immigration Reform Will Be “The End Of The Republican Party.” On the April 17, 2013 edition of her radio show, Laura Ingraham claimed that immigration reform “will be the end of the Republican Party as we know it.” [Courtside Entertainment Group, The Laura Ingraham Show4/17/13]

Ingraham Repeatedly Stumped For Anti-Immigrant Candidate Brat

Ingraham Blog Promotes Dave Brat Rally Appearance. On June 2, Ingraham’s blog promoted her appearance at a rally for Dave Brat, touting his “consistent, principled stance against Amnesty.” The post, which includes a statement from Brat, cites an upcoming House vote on amnesty as a reason to support Brat: “A new report shows that House Leadership is eyeing a vote on Amnesty just 5 days after the June 10th primary is over. Is this a coincidence? Vote Brat and stop amnesty once and for all.” [LauraIngraham.com, 6/2/14

DuringBrat Rally, Ingraham Says She Wishes Cantor Had Been Traded For American Prisoner Of Taliban. At a June 4 rally for Dave Brat, Laura Ingraham said she wished Obama had traded Eric Cantor for Bowe Bergdahl, the soldier held captive by the Taliban:

INGRAHAM: I kind of wish, thinking about this, that President Obama would have thought this through a little bit more. And maybe, for getting Sgt. Bergdahl out of captivity, instead of sending five Taliban MVPs over there, he could have just traded one Eric Cantor. [MSNBC, The Last Word6/10/14]

Ingraham's Website Posts Election Day Reminder: Vote Brat, Stop Amnesty. An Election Day post on Laura Ingraham’s blog slammed Eric Cantor for “announcing that he will work with Barack Obama to pass amnesty for illegal children,” and told readers to instead “VOTE DAVE BRAT TODAY.” [LauraIngraham.com, 6/10/14]

Ingraham Blamed Cantor For The"Enticement" Of Immigrant Children In Humanitarian Crisis. On the June 3 edition of The Laura Ingraham Show, Ingraham blasted congressional Republicans and Democrats who support any kind of immigration reform, including Rep. Eric Cantor, for the “enticement” of the immigrant children into the country, which she described as “an invasion facilitated by our own government.” [Courtside Entertainment Group, The Laura Ingraham Show, 6/3/14, via Media Matters]

Ingraham Attends Henrico, VA Rally For Brat. The Richmond Times-Dispatch reported conservative radio talk show host Laura Ingraham’s attendance at a June 3 rally for Virginia congressional candidate Dave Brat:

Dave Brat drew some star power Tuesday night in the final week of his bid to beat House Majority Leader Eric Cantor in the 7th Congressional District’s Republican primary.

Laura Ingraham, a conservative radio talk show host, author and political commentator, attended a Brat rally at a country club in Cantor’s Glen Allen neighborhood in Henrico County. [Richmond Times-Dispatch6/3/14]

Fox Personalities Tout Ingraham’s Role In Brat’s Defeat Of Cantor

Fox News Personalities Praise “The Power Of Talk Radio” For Dave Brat’s Unseating Majority Leader Eric CantorDuring the June 10 edition of The Kelly File, Fox’s Brit Hume claimed Laura Ingraham and other conservative radio show hosts’ support of Dave Brat helped him to defeat Majority Leader Eric Cantor. Hume added, ”There are parts of this country where if Laura Ingraham, and Ann Coulter, and Mark Levin are on the radio supporting you, that’s worth a lot. … In the right place, with the right constituency, those people hold real power.” Kelly chimed in that it was “the power of talk radio.” [Fox News, The Kelly File6/10/14, via Media Matters]

Fox’s Kelly: Ingraham’s Support Was “Instrumental” In Brat’s Victory Over Cantor. During Fox News’ live coverage of Rep. Cantor’s primary defeat, Fox host Megyn Kelly said Laura Ingraham, Ann Coulter, and others “were instrumental, perhaps, in causing this event tonight.” When she interviewed Ingraham later in the show, Kelly more firmly called her “instrumental” in Cantor’s defeat, noting that “she campaigned for Brat, she rallied for Brat, and must be very pleased with the results tonight.” During her interview, Ingraham continued to warn the GOP away from immigration reform. [Fox News, The O’Reilly Factor6/10/14]

h/t: Media Matters For America

WOW! A major upset. 

H/T: Alan Suderman at Huffington Post, via AP