Posts tagged "Tea Party Movement"

Ben Dimiero at mediamattersforamerica:

Five years ago, Fox News expanded its online presence with “Fox Nation.” Early promos for the site told viewers that it’s “time to say ‘no’ to biased media and ‘yes’ to fair play and free speech,” while promising that Fox fans had finally found “a place to call home.” Similarly, the “Statement of Purpose” on the site announces that it is dedicated to “the core principles of tolerance, open debate, civil discourse, and fair and balanced coverage of the news.”

But after its launch, the site quickly turned into — in the words of former Fox News producer Joe Muto — the “seedy underbelly of the Fox News online empire.” Fox Nation has for years openly cheered Republican politicians and policies, actively organized for the tea party, smeared Democrats and progressives, engaged in blatant race-baiting on a near-daily basis, and routinely elevated nonsense from the conservative fringe.

So while Fox Nation is celebrating its fifth birthday and its self-proclaimed role as a “defender of the Constitution and the home of hot debates,” Media Matters looks back at some (but nowhere near all) of the lowlights from the site’s first five years.

"Hip-Hop BBQ"

Fox Nation’s most infamous moment, which garnered widespread attention and ridicule, was posting a story about President Obama’s 2011 birthday party with the following headline and image:

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Obama’s “War On Marriage”

After President Obama declared support for marriage equality in 2012, Fox Nation attacked him for declaring “WAR ON MARRIAGE” (the site later changed the headline):

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Fox Nation has repeatedly trafficked in conspiracies about the president’s birth certificate, highlighting numerous stories promoting the nonsensical theory. More than once in 2009, Fox Nation attached an image of Obama wearing Somali clothes to stories promoting birther claptrap:

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The Impending Apocalypse

In February 2011, Fox Nation promoted what Fox & Friends Saturday co-host Clayton Morris described as an “incredible piece of video” showing a “greenish figure” in a crowd of Egyptian protesters. The site quoted fellow conspiracy website WND explaining that the green figure “resembles an erect rider atop a horse in Medieval-like barding.” The headline, which was pulled from Clayton Morris’ blog, asked:

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A Vicious Smear Of Planned Parenthood

In 2012, Fox Nation proved how low they were willing to sink to smear their enemies. That December, a British charity for victims of domestic abuse released a video urging women not to conceal the effects of domestic violence. After Planned Parenthood posted the video to its Facebook page, Fox Nation highlighted a since-deleted article from LifeNews.com that completely inverted the message of the ad, posting it under this headline:

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"Fox Nation Victory!"

Fox Nation’s open campaigning for Republican and conservative causes has led the site to repeatedly declare things like a 2009 congressional delay of health care reform (which the site called the “health care rationing bill”) a “Fox Nation Victory!” This 2011 headline and image about the House voting to repeal Obamacare perhaps best captures the tone of the site’s health care reform politicking:

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Obama Handing Land To Mexico

In 2010, Fox News show America Live embarrassed itself with a “ludicrous" story about how the Obama administration was responsible for a "massive stretch" of Arizona land being closed, with host Shannon Bream telling viewers, "Critics say the administration is, in effect, giving a major strip of the Southwest back to Mexico." (The entire story was painfully misleading.) Fox Nation ramped things up by posting a link to the America Live segment with a headline informing readers that Obama “Gives Back Major Strip of AZ to Mexico.”

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"JOIN YOUR LOCAL TEA PARTY"

Shortly after its launch, Fox Nation morphed into both a cheering section and a staging area for the tea party. The site even hosted a “virtual tea party” in 2009 for people who “can’t get to a tea party.” To give an idea of what Fox Nation’s early tea party coverage looked like, here’s a headline from March 2010:

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Hillary’s “Communist” Clothing, “Macho” Putin, The “Nuzzling” President, And Other Lowlights

Other headlines that have appeared on Fox Nation throughout the years. May 2010:

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July 2013:

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January 2010:

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March 2014:

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August 2010: 

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December 2009:

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September 2009:

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July 2009:

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June 2009:

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June 2009: 

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May 2009:

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Not to mention numerous instances during the five years of Fox Nation’s existence documented by NewsHounds.us that the FN comments routinely featured calls of death threats directed at President Barack Obama, Nancy Pelosi, Harry Reid, Eric Holder, Muslims, Hispanics, African-Americans, LGBTQs, unions, or basically any liberal/progressive in America. 

h/t: Daniel Strauss at TPM Livewire

As the Tea Party celebrates its fifth anniversary, we decided to look at five of the myths that Tea Party supporters, and many pundits, continue to believe about the far-right movement.

Myth #1: Tea Party Cares About Economic Stewardship

If Tea Party activists believe they are on a crusade to save the American economy, they have an odd way of showing it. The Tea Party was responsible for an economically harmful and utterly pointless government shutdown and has several times threatened economic catastrophe byrefusing to raise the debt limit — with their hostage-taking strategycontributing to a S&P credit downgrade and lower consumer confidence.

The Treasury Department warned in the midst of last year’s government shutdown [PDF]: “A default would be unprecedented and has the potential to be catastrophic: credit markets could freeze, the value of the dollar could plummet, U.S. interest rates could skyrocket, the negative spillovers could reverberate around the world, and there might be a financial crisis and recession that could echo the events of 2008 or worse…. Because the debt ceiling impasse contributed to the financial market disruptions, reduced confidence and increased uncertainty, the economic expansion was no doubt weaker than it otherwise would have been.”

One problem might be that Tea Party leaders seem to have no clue what they are talking about.

Tea Party politicians dismissed concerns about failing to raise the debt limit — with one Tea Party-aligned congressman arguing that such a move would help the economy — and didn’t seem to grasp the fact that “raising the debt ceiling simply lets Treasury borrow the money it needs to pay all U.S. bills and other legal obligations in full and on time” and isn’t a “license to spend more.”

Similarly, a Bloomberg News poll found that 93 percent of Tea Party Republicans believe the federal budget deficit is growing, even while it israpidly shrinking.

Myth #2: Tea Party Wants Entitlement Cuts

We keep hearing about how the Tea Party will lead a push to cut entitlement programs, but Tea Party members are disproportionately entitlement program benefactors. A New York Times/CBS poll found that Tea Party members are more likely than others to claim that they or a family member receives Social Security benefits or is covered by Medicaid, and 62 percent believe “the benefits from government programs such as Social Security and Medicare [are] worth the costs of those programs.”

According to a McClatchy-Marist poll, 76 percent of Tea Party supporters oppose Social Security and Medicare cuts while 70 percent said they were against cuts to Medicaid.

Of course, many Tea Party supporters don’t seem to mind public programs when they are the ones benefiting from them, and Republicans continue to criticize reductions in future Medicare spending that they voted for.

“[W]hat many of the Tea Party candidates have found is that when push comes to shove, their backers want to protect their entitlements as much as the next guy,” writes Shikha Dalmia of the Reason Foundation. “In fact, much of the fury of the Tea Partiers against government stimulus and bailouts might have less to do with any principled belief in the limits of government and more to do with fear of what this will do to their own entitlements.”

Myth #3: Tea Party Faces Government Persecution

The Tea Party has desperately clutched onto a conspiracy theory that the IRS specifically targeted Tea Party groups to help seal President Obama’s re-election. Of course, it turns out that the IRS actually scrutinized liberal and conservative groups alike. The faux-scandal was hyped and distorted by congressional Republicans, and Tea Party leaders predicted that it would rejuvenate the movement.

As Alex Seitz-Wald reported: “We know that in fact the IRS targeted lots of different kinds of groups, not just conservative ones; that the only organizations whose tax-exempt statuses were actually denied were progressive ones; that many of the targeted conservative groups legitimatelycrossed the line; that the IG’s report was limited to only Tea Party groups at congressional Republicans’ request; and that the White House was in no way involved in the targeting and didn’t even know about it until shortly before the public did. In short, the entire scandal narrative was a fiction.”

Rather than face facts, leaders are out with a fresh and similarly dubious conspiracy that proposed IRS rules on political activity by certain nonprofits will target conservative organizations for discrimination.

Myth #4: Tea Party Ignores Social Issues

Many Tea Party leaders — including Ted Cruz, Rand Paul, Louie Gohmert, Michele Bachmann, Mike Lee, Jim DeMint and Glenn Beck — are also favorites of the Religious Right. The GOP victories in the 2010 midterm electionbrought about what the Daily Beast called “one of the most religiously conservative [House of Representatives] in recent history” and Republican politicians in Congress and state legislatures immediately pursued a crackdown on abortion rights.

Glenn Beck’s massive 2010 Tea Party rally on the National Mall turned into a religious revival meeting. Last year, even the openly gay founder of the National Capital Tea Party Patriots addressed an anti-gay marriage rally in front of the Supreme Court. And far-right pastor Rick Scarborough decided to establish his own group, Tea Party Unity, to promote his call for a “class action lawsuit” against homosexuality.

Pew found that just as “the Tea Party is much more Republican and conservative than the public as a whole… Tea Party supporters also tend to take socially conservative positions on abortion and same-sex marriage.” Tea Party activists oppose marriage equality and abortion rights at rates nearly identical to Republicans at large, and are just as likely to cite religion as the driving force on their stances on such issues.

A 2013 American Values survey observed that the majority of Tea Party activists “identify with the Christian Right,” and a study by political scientists Robert Putnam and David Campbell found Tea Party members to be “disproportionately social conservatives” with a penchant for the “overt use of religious language and imagery.” “It thus makes sense that the Tea Party ranks alongside the Christian Right in unpopularity,” they added.

Myth #5: Tea Party Has Wide Popularity

Tea Party politicians like to fashion themselves as champions of a broadly popular movement that has supporters across partisan lines. Bachmann thinks the Tea Party represents “virtually 90 percent of America ” and a poll of Tea Party supporters found that 84 percent agree that “the views of the people involved in the Tea Party movement generally reflect the views of most Americans.” Beck even believes that most Americans are in the Tea Party and to the right of the GOP.

But while the Tea Party is far from dead, a majority of Americans have an unfavorable view of the right-wing movement.

In December, Gallup found that the Tea Party has never held widespread support.

The Tea Party has been deceiving America for 5+ years now. 

h/t: Brian Tashman at RWW

cc: mediamattersforamerica

Fox News is allowing Sean Hannity to promote the Tea Party Patriots on its airwaves even though the group is financially connected to the conservative host.

Huffington Post’s Michael Calderone reported today that Hannity, who also hosts a Premiere Radio Networks program, has been fundraising for Tea Party Patriots (TPP) in emails, and “has also promoted the group’s efforts on his Fox News program.”  

TVNewser reported that in response to Calderone’s report, “Fox News tells us Hannity’s involvement with the Tea Party group is for his radio show, and has nothing to do with his FNC show or role with the network.”

But Fox’s response that TPP has “nothing to do” with Fox is disingenuous and a dodge of ethical standards. A Media Matters review found that Hannity has repeatedly done promotional tie-ins for TPP on radio and then promoted or hosted the group on his Fox News program.

For instance, Hannity did radio promos for TPP on July 31 and August 12. He then hosted TPP president Jenny Beth Martin on his Fox program Hannity on August 20, and September 9. Martin was also part of a “special audience edition” of Hannity on August 16. Fox even allowed Hannity to promote TPP’s website HannityForSanity.com on August 1.  

Calderone reported that “Hannity made a passing reference to the Tea Party Patriots on his Fox News show” on February 19 in which Hannity said “The Tea Party Patriots are partners on my radio show.” Calderone added that “was the only time on Fox News that Hannity has described Tea Party Patriots as a ‘partner’ of his radio program,” according to Nexis. 

[…]

Though it’s not clear how much Hannity is receiving for his Tea Party Patriots promotions — representatives for Martin, TPP, and Hannity didn’t respond to comment requests from Calderone —  Hannity received big money for prior promotions for another conservative group.

Politico reported in 2011 that the Heritage Foundation paid $1.3 million to Hannity’s program for “promotional tie-ins, as well as regular on-air plugs - praising or sometimes defending the groups, while urging listeners to donate - often woven seamlessly into programming in ways that do not seem like paid advertising.”

Fox News previously forced Hannity to cancel a taping of a 2010 Fox News show at a Cincinnati Tea Party event because it charged admission and had “all proceeds” benefiting the organization. At the time Fox portrayed themselves to media as “furious” with Hannity.

Today, the Tea Party turns 5, and their anti-American agenda has destroyed America the past five years. 

Tea Partiers, Tenthers, and the corporate sponsors who support them have come up with a variety of ways to circumvent the federal government and bypass the federal regulatory system, including efforts to hold an Article V Convention, commonly called a “Con Con,” to amend the Constitution and the Sen. Ted Cruz (R, TX)-developed plan for use of “interstate compacts” to block federal law.

In a report for the Center for American Progress, Ian Millhiser described these state’s rights efforts as a project for “seceding from the union one law at a time.”  These initiatives could result in a Balkanized confederation of states that would be no match against the power of international corporations and would allow for eliminating the regulatory system and the social safety net.

The most recent issue of The Public Eye magazine includes two extensive articles on the efforts of conservatives to shift power to the states, including Frederick Clarkson’s article on the State Policy Network’s growing influence, and my article on the growing nullification movement (co-authored by Frank Cocozzelli).

Nullification is based on a legal theory that states can block enforcement of federal laws individual states deem unconstitutional. But another route to “nullification” was popularized by Senator Cruz before he even became a senator, and promoted through Tea Party organizations and the highly-controversial American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC).


The Constitution, in Article I, Section 10, allows for states to form interstate compacts with the consent of Congress.  This is most commonly done to oversee shared resources, such as waterways.  One of the earliest formed and better known of these compacts is the New York – New Jersey Port Authority. But Cruz
 is claiming that interstate compacts can be expanded as a way to circumvent presidential veto power.Cruz’s idea is to use “interstate compacts” to shield states from federal laws. He developed the concept in 2010 as an alternative option for “nullifying Obamacare.” Just prior to his election as senator, Cruz worked as senior fellow with the Center for Tenth Amendment Studies at the Texas Public Policy Center, the state’s “free market” think tank and a State Policy Network member. While the concept of interstate compacts is not new, Cruz’s idea to use them as a strategy for shielding states from federal laws is uniquely original, which he freely admitted to Fred Barnes of the Weekly Standard  in January 2011.

[…]

The concept was also promoted through the State Policy Network’s “Federalism in Action” program, and Cruz himself presented the idea at the 2010 American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) conference, where it promptly became the foundation for ALEC’s “Health Care Compact ACT” model legislation for state legislators.

To date, this Healthcare Compact Act has been passed in eight states: Texas, Oklahoma, Utah, Missouri, Indiana, Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina. The healthcare compact is promoted and tracked through an organization called the Healthcare Compact Alliance, a project of Competitive Governance Action, a 501(c)(4) co-founded by Texas businessman Leo Linbeck III and Eric O’Keefe and sharing the address of the Linbeck Group, LLC, in Houston.

The vision of shielding entire areas of state regulation from the federal government has been further enshrined by ALEC in the form of a model bill developed by their International Task Force, and approved by the ALEC board of directors.  Under the title “State Legislature United Compact,” the model bill provides validation for those who half-jokingly warn about the “United States of ALEC,” apparently giving ALEC a role in forming and running the commission that would organize the interstate compact, and ensuring that like-minded conservatives would control the topics and outcomes of a convention.

ALEC’s December 2013 States and Nation Summit in D.C. was sponsored, in part, by another Linbeck and O’Keefe nonprofit, called the Citizens for Self Governance.  Its legal name is the John Hancock Committee of the States and it’s the parent organization of the Convention of the States (one of several organizations promoting an Article V convention to amend the Constitution).  The organization was incubated prior to gaining its own nonprofit status by American Majority, an organization founded by Drew and Ned Ryun to “infuse new Tea Party blood into the political system.”

Until now, the only method used to amend the Constitution has been through a two-thirds vote of both houses of Congress, followed by ratification by three-fourths of the states. However, there is another process in Article V that allows for a convention to be called by two thirds of state legislatures.  Mark Meckler, cofounder of the Tea Party Patriots, is now president of the Citizens for Self Governance and is overseeing the group’s Article V convention efforts.

Meckler promoted the Convention of the States project in a session at ALEC’s December summit. On the Saturday following the summit, roughly 100 state legislators from 32 states met at Mt. Vernon to advance convention plans.  Ferris’ reflections on the event acknowledged that there are divisions in conservative ranks between those who want the “con-con,” and those who fear a “runaway con-con” infiltrated and overrun by liberals. Historical revisionist David Barton has just recently endorsed a Constitutional Convention, while both Phyllis Schlafly’s Eagle Forum and the John Birch Society (JBS) fall into the second category.

As noted in The Public Eye article Nullification, Neo-Confederates, and the Revenge of the Right, the JBS has become a major force behind state nullification efforts across the country.

Despite misgivings about a “runaway con-con,” there are several right-wing groups around the country working to organize a convention, but with some disagreements about how it would work.  PRA senior fellow Frederick Clarkson, Salon’s Paul Rosenberg, and I have all listened in on conference calls by one such organization that has differences of opinion with the Convention of the States on how to proceed (you can read Rosenberg’s story about it in Salon). The leader of that organization has a plan for the first amendment to be a “Sovereignty and State’s Rights Amendment,” allowing any federal law to be “countermanded” by the agreement of 30 states.

This state’s rights movement is gaining traction across the country, including among some on the political Left, but the money and organizing behind the effort is solidly conservative­—or perhaps better described as paleo-libertarian, or a combination of radical anti-government philosophies wedded to social conservatism.

h/t: Rachel Tabachnick at Political Research Associates

The growing visibility of a staunchly conservative movement in France has prompted comparisons with the Tea Party of the United States.

Interior Minister Manuel Valls has warned that France was seeing the birth of its own version of the grassroots, anti-tax Tea Party movement amid a surge of anti-government demonstrations by right-wing groups and religious conservatives across the country.

“We are witnessing the creation of the French version of the Tea Party. By exploiting the political and leadership crisis on the right, and the National Front party’s move away from the far-right, a conservative and reactionary right has been set free,” Valls, a Socialist, told the Journal du Dimanche in an interview published on Sunday. 

The eye-opening comparison came hours ahead of massive rallies in defense of traditional families in Paris and the eastern city of Lyon. They were organized by the so-called “Manif Pour Tous” (Protest for All) group that staged massive protests against gay marriage last year.

Sunday’s march, which police said drew 80,000 people in Paris, was just the latest public display of anger against President François Hollande’s government in recent days.

Hundreds of primary school students were pulled from their classrooms last week as part of a grassroots campaign opposing a new programme teaching gender equality and tolerance of homosexual parents within public schools.

The call to boycott schools one day per month, answered mostly by conservative Christian and Muslim parents, came on the heels of a “Day of Anger” against the government, which saw around 17,000 people hit the streets of the French capital on January 26.

That protest, in which some shouted anti-Semitic slogans, ended in clashes that wounded 19 police officers and led to the detention of 226 people.

Valls said that voicing opposition to the government was a legal right, but insisted that there was a worrying confluence of “anti-elite, anti-government, anti-tax, anti-parliament, anti-media” ideas that was threatening French democracy.

Longing for past

Sunday’s march included some prominent conservative lawmakers, like MP Henri Guaino of the right-wing Union for a Popular Movement (UMP) and MP Marion Maréchal-Le Pen, the niece of anti-immigration leader Marine Le Pen.

Their participation appeared to lend credence to Valls’ idea that a new, more radical movement within the political establishment – something akin to America’s Tea Party – is brewing this side of the Atlantic.

For Nicole Bacharan, a national fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, similarities exist.

“In both movements I see an array of people who feel they are becoming a minority within their own country, who long for a return back to a time when their countries were more traditional, more religious, whiter,” Bacharan told FRANCE 24.

The scholar said that Tea Partiers in the U.S. and people displaying France’s new conservative streak shared mutual feelings of being ignored by the political establishment and the media, but that sentiment was even more acute in France.

“In the United States there is more room for Tea Party members to express themselves, like on [the cable TV channel] Fox News,” Bacharan noted. “In France no news outlet takes sides in such a partisan way, and it’s true that the French media tends to look down on these movements as (being) something kind of backwards.”

If a nativist bent unites the allegedly kindred movements in Paris and Washington, observers said one key issue keeps them miles apart: the vision of a limited government.

“The Tea Party rejects big government, and often evokes ideas of the founding fathers as the basis for its principles … even their name suggests this,” said Thomas Snegaroff, a U.S. expert at France’s Institute for International and Strategic Studies.

In France few, if any, political movements disagree with a strong, central government.

Detractors of Hollande’s left-leaning government do not have the same “historical anchor” as the Tea Party, making “more religious or biological” arguments the basis for their struggle, according to Snegaroff.


h/t: Agence France-Presse, via The Raw Story

At a breakfast event with the Tea Party organization Tulsa 9:12 Project last week, Congressman Jim Bridenstine (R-OK) saw no need to rebuke or even disagree with a questioner who said that President Obama should be executed.

“Obama, he’s not president, as far as I’m concerned, he should be executed as an enemy combatant,” the questioner said, before asking the congressman about “the Muslims that he is shipping into our country through pilots and commercial jets” (a claim based on a bizarre right-wing conspiracy theory).

“This guy is a criminal and nobody’s stopped him,” she declared.

Bridenstine didn’t respond to her call for the president’s execution, but agreed that Obama is “lawless” and said he rules “by decree” and through the United Nations.

 

h/t: Sahil Kapur at TPM


h/t: Janet Reitman at Rolling Stone

demnewswire:

GOP Infighting continues

(via thepoliticalfreakshow)

A new TV ad from Jennifer Wexton — a former state prosecutor who is running for the Virginia state senate seat that will be vacated by Attorney General-elect Mark Herring – has so upset Tea Party Nation president Judson Phillips that he is accusing her of being worse than murderers, rapists, and robbers.

In the ad, Wexton says, “as a prosecutor, I put violent offenders in prison. In the Virginia Senate, I’ll fight just as hard against Tea Party Republicans who would take away a woman’s health care and her right to choose, even in cases of rape and incest.”

The right-wing Media Research Center jumped on the ad, claiming that Wexton “made a shocking comparison between violent rapists that she once tried as a prosecutor to ‘Tea Party Republicans’ in the Virginia legislature.”

This moved Phillips to post a screed on his blog, which he also emailed to his group’s members, saying that Wexton “is worse than any of the people I put away” as a district attorney in Tennessee , including those accused of robbery, rape and murder.

“During my career as a prosecutor, I sent people to prison for some horrible things,” Phillips writes. “As far as I am concerned, I would rather see one of them elected than Jennifer Wexton. That is how extreme she is and how far to the left she is.”

 

h/t: Miranda Blue at RWW

Milton Wolf is a physician who is challenging Kansas Sen. Pat Roberts from the right in this year’s Republican primary. He is also the second cousin once removed of President Obama.

Wolf has taken full advantage of this family connection, bringing up his relation to the president in frequent Washington Times columns and touting his “Obamacare family feud” on FoxNews.com.

In fact, Wolf’s distant relation to Obama seems to have only encouraged his embrace of Tea Party attacks on the president. In an interview with Tea Party Express yesterday, Wolf offered some words of wisdom: “You can’t choose your family. But you know what you can do? You can choose to rise up and stop your family from destroying America.”

“I think Barack Obama is the worst president in our history and we have got to have the courage to stop him,” he added. 

Wolf went on to boast that he has “become his most vocal and fiercest critic”  and is “one of the few people on this planet, I am sure, who have actually stood toe-to-toe with Barack Obama, looked him in the eye, and told him that he’s wrong.” 

Wolf also repeated his previous claims that the president improperly targeted him with an IRS audit and attempted to get him fired from his Washington Times gig.

At an event in New Orleans in September, Wolf also played up his “family feud,” saying, “I think I’m everything that’s wrong with Barack Obama’s America. I’ve got a wife, a job and a gun.”

"It’s true, Barack Obama and I are cousins. And I would guess because of that you may wonder if I’m the real deal or not. You may have a little concern about me. Let me assure you that I am from a branch of the family that has actually read, understands and believes in the constitution," declared Wolf.

"In fact, I think I’m everything that’s wrong with Barack Obama’s America. I’ve got a wife, a job and a gun," he continued, before adding that he has several guns, not just one.

h/t: Miranda Blue at RWW

They hate unions, hate the minimum wage, hate labor laws in general and in some cases they even hate bans on child labor. But now, some Wisconsin Republicans are taking the extra step in the GOP’s war on workers by moving to establish a seven day work week, because in reality, time off from work is nothing short of an affront to workers. 

Glenn Grothman, a Tea Party Republican state Senator from Bend, has put forward a proposal to the state legislature, which would seek to roll back many of the gains for worker protections won by unions, central among them, the five-day work week. Referring to the laws as “goofy,” Grothman suggested they be scaled back, naturally, in the name of “freedom.” Wisconsin is one of only a few states in the nation to mandate by law that workers be given at least one 24-hour “rest period” per every five days worked. The once staunchly pro-union mid-western state has been a battle ground over labor rights since the 2010 election of Governor Scott Walker and the occupation of the capital Madison. Throughout the early part of 2011, shortly after Walker’s inauguration, the capital city of Madison experienced a long and highly publicized occupation protest by workers, organized unions and progressive activists, who opposed Walker’s assault on collective bargaining rights and agreements, leading ultimately to a failed recall effort in 2012. 

[…]

Calling the five day work week law, which serves to ensure employers are not over-working their employees, “goofy,” Grothman went on in an attempt to rationalize his proposals in an interview with the Huffington Post stating:

“…you may have a factory that wants to run more shifts or want to work overtime and is short of people — and the employee wants to work, and the employer wants them to work, why shouldn’t they be able to work?”

Now, beyond ignoring the larger economic realities of employers throughout the country, routinely seeking to reduce working hours and outsource many jobs either to overseas plants or through automation, Grothman seems to be overlooking the slightly smaller but just as pressing realities in his own state. With Wisconsin presently 33rd in the nation for overall job creation and the Walker administration’s track record of killing job creating public works projects, such as the 2011 light rail contract with Spanish train maker Talgo, which resulted in the loss of several thousand jobs and the filing of a civil suit by Talgo against Walker and the state for breach of contract, the presumed factory jobs with oodles of available overtime are likely about as in touch with reality as Grothman’s opinions on women in the workplace.

In the same Huffpo interview, when asked about equal pay for woman, the Winsconsin Tea Party Senator said simply that “You could argue money is more important for men.”

The only real thing is, no, you can’t Glenn. You actually can’t. Maybe you should take some time off and think a little more about these things. Luckily for you, there’s a law about that still.

h/t: Nick Goroff at AATTP

Paul Vallely, a former general who now works as a conservative activist and Fox News analyst, suggested in a recent interview that President Obama should face citizen’s arrest for his supposedly treasonous crimes.

After suggesting that the country hold a “national recall” election, which he admitted has no basis in the constitution, Vallely urged people “get off our derrieres” and protest the government in the millions: “If we’ve got to march in the state capitals, if we’ve got to march in Washington with one hundred million people, then that’s what we need to do.”

He even called for a citizens’ arrest against the President and administration officials: “I would say if we can make citizens’ arrest, I challenge our government that if we have people that are conducting treason against the United States and the best interests of our country, violating the Constitution, violating our laws, just as they are doing with these excessive executive orders that are coming out of the White House where you have a President and his team that doesn’t care about the Constitution.”

Back in November, Vallely endorsed a Tea Party rally in Washington D.C. calling for Obama’s overthrow, although it didn’t exactly draw one hundred million people. Vallely has also published several columns that accuse Obama of treason.

“They will do anything they can to win, they will do anything, they will go for the throat and that’s what we have to do because we’re in battle to save the United States, so we have options out there and we have to pursue all of those options to take the country back.”

Vallely said he that an Egyptian-style uprising against Obama is needed instead of impeachment: “I would use the Egyptian model where they had 33 million Egyptians stand up to oust Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood. We need millions to stand up in our state capitals and in Washington D.C. and we need to have that done within the next twelve months because I can tell you , my forecast, things are going to get far worse than better, especially with Obamacare and the other things that are happening to degrade the effectiveness of our federal government.” 

h/t: Brian Tashman at RWW