Posts tagged "World News"

thepoliticalfreakshow:

The latest rumor to make its rounds on the web is a tip from the Jerusalem Post that in Donetsk, Ukraine, Jews older than 16 years old will be forced to register their identities with the pro-Russian separatists led by Denis Pushilin, whose forces have recently taken over several government buildings in the city. This is actually just a provocation most likely planted by pro-Ukrainian groups.

Rain, an independent TV station in Russia, quoted Pushilin as saying the documents did not come from him. Some people from the local Jewish community agreed documents were an attempt to provoke a conflict and blame it on Pushilin and his separatists, according to the Ukrainian news publication the News of Donbass.

To set the record straight: Jews in Ukraine are not being asked to register with pro-Russian separatists at risk of losing citizenship. This war of information, however, might not be ending anytime soon.

President Vladimir Putin ramped up his aggressive language toward Southeastern Ukraine in his four-hour live Q&A session Thursday, when people called in, texted and sent video messages with their questions. He has made it more obvious that his priorities are protecting ethnic Russians over helping Ukraine become more stable.

We can see this in his increasingly pro-Russian language. Putin pubically called the Southeast Ukraine, which is bordered by Moldova, Donetsk, Odessa and Dnepropetrovsk “Novorossiya” or “New Russia” for the first time. In other words, he made it clear this region is now rightfully a new kind of Russia and should be treated as such. The area was last called “New Russia” in 1922 when it was “given” to Ukraine by the Bolsheviks. “God knows why” they gave these cities to Ukraine, Putin said Thursday.

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The “New Russia” label is particularly scary when coupled with the way Putin is attempting to divide Russia from the West. Putin described the western man as being “for himself,” and “the more successful the person, the better.” He distinguished this from a “person of the Russian world” who thinks there is “something higher” of his own life. The more Putin creates these juxtaposition, the more like it seems he is not going to let down on Ukraine.

Sure, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and his Russian counterparts agreed on a de-escalation resolution Thursday in Geneva. But as is clear in Putin’s rhetoric: If it’s up to him — and it might just be — Ukraine is New Russia.”

As Putin increases his anti-fascist, pro-Russian rhetoric, he renders the Ukrainian government weak, further destabilizing the country. That’s why local Ukrainian groups in Donetsk resorted to faking an anti-Semitic document on the part of pro-Russian separatists.

If Putin doesn’t put a halt to elevating the interests of ethnic Russians over the interest of all Ukrainians, more members of the international community invested in this conflict will be blinded by his war of misinformation.

Source: Sarah Kaufman for Policy Mic

h/t: Miranda Blue at RWW

thepoliticalfreakshow:

New party tries to woo Hungary’s Roma (via AFP)

With elections looming on April 6, a new party is trying to win over Hungary’s largest ethnic minority, the Roma, a community scarred by deep poverty and racism and disillusioned by traditional politics. “Until now, the Roma have never had credible…

breakingnews:

Same-sex couples legally marry in England, Wales

BBC NewsCouples flocked to town halls during the early hours of Saturday as a law legalizing same-sex marriage took effect in England and Wales.

The law, which was passed last year, was hailed by politicians from both the country’s main parties. Prime Minister David Cameron said he believed the law sent a message that people were equal “whether gay or straight.” 

Scotland also passed a similar law in February but the first same-sex marriages aren’t expected until October. 

Photo: Peter Tatchell (left) was chief witness at Peter McGraith and David Cabreza’s wedding in Islington. (Getty Images)

 

(via thepoliticalfreakshow)

h/t: J. Lester Feder at BuzzFeed World

h/t: Cécile Alduy at The Nation

h/t: Ben Armbruster at Think Progress World

h/t: Ben Armbruster at Think Progress World

Erdoğan’s a menace to Turkey and to Kemalist heritage. 

h/t: Lauren C. Williams at Think Progress World

thepoliticalfreakshow:

Twitter is investigating reports that the service was blocked in Turkey late Thursday after Turkish Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan warned at a rally that he will “eradicate Twitter” and had a court order to do so.

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#ALERT | #Twitter has been blocked by the government in #Turkeynow!

“In the ongoing situation, Twitter has remained indifferent to remove certain links despite court orders favoring the citizens of the Turkish Republic,” Erdogan’s office said in a statement published by the Turkish website Sabah and translated by Al Monitor. “We came to [the] conclusion that in order to relieve our citizens, there is no way left beyond blocking Twitter, which disregards court orders, does not obey the rule of law.”

At a daily press briefing on Thursday, U.S. State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said: “As we have previously stated, we remain very concerned by any suggestion that social media sites could be shut down. Democracies are strengthened by the diversity of public voices.

“An independent and unfettered media is an essential element of democratic, open societies, and crucial to ensuring official transparency and accountability”

As the news spread, Twitter offered users a way to bypass the ban by tweeting via text message.

Turkish users: you can send Tweets using SMS. Avea and Vodafone text START to 2444. Turkcell text START to 2555.

Twitter users in Turkey and abroad immediately shared information on how to bypass the ban via SMS and VPN. From inside Turkey,#TwitterIsBlockedInTurkey and #DictatorErdoganbegan to trend within hours.

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#twitter blocked in #turkey tonight. folks are painting #google dns numbers onto the posters of the governing party.

In spite of ‘block’ there have been 272K tweets using#TwitterisblockedinTurkey in past 3hrs. 207K of those from Turkey itself.

Erdogan – who is currently fighting corruption allegations and waves of anti-government protests – has made repeated threats against social media users. Memes mocking the embattled Erdogan and his latest media crackdown also circulated widely.

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12 milyon kullanጜısı olan #Twitter'a erişim engellendi! Dünyada sadece 2 ülkede yasak! http://t.co/6xxOdU7eVs

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a list of apps on an average turkish phone. in case.

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All these jokes/pics about death of Twitter in Turkey? I see them all from tweeps tweeting FROM Turkey.RT @DTJ_Online

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"So?.. What’s wrong? Everyone is still tweeting…"

Source: Miriam Berger for Buzzfeed

nbcnews:

Ukraine to withdraw troops from Crimea, officials announce

(Photo: Anton Pedko / EPA)

Ukraine is preparing to withdraw its soldiers and their families from Crimea, officials in Kiev announced Wednesday.

Continue reading

thepoliticalfreakshow:

1. On March 16, over 95 percent of voters in Crimea backed a plan to secede from Ukraine and join Russia.

On March 16, over 95 percent of voters in Crimea backed a plan to secede from Ukraine and join Russia.
Thomas Peter / Reuters

2. The referendum followed months of protests that forced out Ukraine’s pro-Kremlin president. Putin is expected to reveal Russia’s plan for Crimea in a speech before a special session of parliament on Tuesday.

The referendum followed months of protests that forced out Ukraine’s pro-Kremlin president . Putin is expected to reveal Russia's plan for Crimea in a speech before a special session of parliament on Tuesday.
Sergei Karpukhin / Reuters

3. Now, there is growing unrest in the east of Ukraine, which also has close ties to Russia and counts many Russian-speakers among its residents. There is increasing talk of the possibility of a Russian invasion. How did we get here?

Now, there is growing unrest in the east of Ukraine, which also has close ties to Russia and counts many Russian-speakers among its residents. There is increasing talk of the possibility of a Russian invasion. How did we get here?
Stringer / Reuters

4. Back on March 1, one week after Yanukovych fled Kiev, Vladimir Putin announced his intention to send troops to the Crimean peninsula, a semi-autonomous region of Ukraine.

Back on March 1, one week after Yanukovych fled Kiev, Vladimir Putin announced his intention to send troops to the Crimean peninsula, a semi-autonomous region of Ukraine.
Baz Ratner / Reuters

The war powers that Putin got from Russia’s upper house of parliament extended to all of Ukraine. The day before, Crimea saw the rise of a new provincial government that refused to accept the new government in Kiev.

5. Russian officials repeatedly argued the need to defend Russian-speakers in Crimea and the rest of Ukraine from anti-Russia attacks. Many Ukrainians condemned the move as an “invasion” and dismissed claims of attacks.

Russian officials repeatedly argued the need to defend Russian-speakers in Crimea and the rest of Ukraine from anti-Russia attacks. Many Ukrainians condemned the move as an "invasion" and dismissed claims of attacks.
Ria Novosti / Reuters

6. Many in predominately Russian-speaking Crimea identify strongly with Russia. Crimea houses Russia’s Black Sea fleet, making it both of symbolic and military importance for Russia.

Many in predominately Russian-speaking Crimea identify strongly with Russia. Crimea houses Russia's Black Sea fleet, making it both of symbolic and military importance for Russia.
Saharrr/Saharrr

The majority of Crimeans are ethnically Russian, retaining strong cultural, familial, linguistic, and political ties to Moscow. Soviet Russia gave Ukraine the region of Crimea in 1954, which Ukraine then retained after the Soviet Union fell apart in 1991, counter to Russian opposition.

7. Troops with no identifiable markings, who first appeared days before in Crimea, increased their street presence. Putin and others denied the official presence of Russian troops and called the soldiers local “self-defense” units.

Troops with no identifiable markings, who first appeared days before in Crimea, increased their street presence. Putin and others denied the official presence of Russian troops and called the soldiers local "self-defense" units.
Stringer / Reuters

8. These unmarked soldiers — who Ukraine claimed were sent by Russia — now had control over key government buildings and the airport in Crimea.

These unmarked soldiers — who Ukraine claimed were sent by Russia — now had control over key government buildings and the airport in Crimea.
Baz Ratner / Reuters

9. By March 2, an estimated 16,000 Russian troops were in Crimea, surrounding Ukrainian military bases. Ukraine ordered its armed forces on full alert and saidRussia had “effectively declared war.”

By March 2, an estimated 16,000 Russian troops were in Crimea, surrounding Ukrainian military bases. Ukraine ordered its armed forces on full alert and said Russia had “effectively declared war.”
The Associated Press

10. Western condemnation poured in, with the U.S. and EU threatening political and economic sanctions against Russia for effectively annexing Crimea in violation of international agreements.

Western condemnation poured in, with the U.S. and EU threatening political and economic sanctions against Russia for effectively annexing Crimea in violation of international agreements.
Sergei Karpukhin / Reuters

11. On March 3, the White House offered $1 billion in aid to support Ukraine’s interim government to hold fair elections, implement economic reform, combat corruption, and withstand “politically motivated trade actions by Russia.”

On March 3, the White House offered $1 billion in aid to support Ukraine’s interim government to hold fair elections, implement economic reform, combat corruption, and withstand "politically motivated trade actions by Russia.”
Jonathan Ernst / Reuters

Russia often uses its vast gas resources – the Russian gas giant Gazprom supplies controls nearly one-fifth of the world’s gas reserves – as political leverage in the region. Russia supplies Ukraine with more than half of its gas annually, while around 80% of the gas Russia exports to Europe first passes through Ukraine. Russia repeatedly fought “gas wars” with Ukraine, threatening to cut subsidies to maintain power in Ukraine’s political future.

12. The next day, Putin gave his first remarks on Ukraine since ordering troops into Crimea. In a defiant speech from Moscow, he affirmed the Kremlin’s right to use all options in Ukraine, but adding “there is no reason yet” to use military force.

The next day, Putin gave his first remarks on Ukraine since ordering troops into Crimea. In a defiant speech from Moscow, he affirmed the Kremlin’s right to use all options in Ukraine, but adding “there is no reason yet” to use military force.
Stringer / Reuters

13. Secretary of State John Kerry arrived in Kiev the same day to meet with Ukraine’s interim government. He reiterated support for a diplomatic solution and condemned Russia’s “act of aggression.”

Secretary of State John Kerry arrived in Kiev the same day to meet with Ukraine’s interim government. He reiterated support for a diplomatic solution and condemned Russia’s “act of aggression."
Valentyn Ogirenko / Reuters

14. On March 6, Obama announced an expected set of sanctions against Russia, including visa bans and an executive order against Russian officials “who are most directly involved in destabilizing Ukraine.”

On March 6, Obama announced an expected set of sanctions against Russia , including visa bans and an executive order against Russian officials "who are most directly involved in destabilizing Ukraine.”
Jonathan Ernst / Reuters

15. The threats did little to deter Russia. Most in Crimea supported a return to Russian control. But Crimea’s minority Muslim population, the Tatars, came out against Russia’s intervention.

The threats did little to deter Russia. Most in Crimea supported a return to Russian control. But Crimea’s minority Muslim population, the Tatars , came out against Russia’s intervention.
Sergei L. Loiko/Los Angeles Times / MCT

16. As the referendum neared, violent clashes broke out across the east, where ties to Russia are strongest. In Odessa, Donetsk, and Kharkiv, pro-Russia crowds captured administrative buildings and called for autonomy from Kiev.

As the referendum neared, violent clashes broke out across the east, where ties to Russia are strongest. In Odessa, Donetsk, and Kharkiv, pro-Russia crowds captured administrative buildings and called for autonomy from Kiev.
AP Photo/Sergei Vaganov

17. On March 13, protests in Donetsk turned deadly. Some claimed pro-Russian activists had provoked the violence, in hopes of bolstering Russia’s claim that it needed to intervene in order to protect Russian-speakers and return calm.

On March 13, protests in Donetsk turned deadly . Some claimed pro-Russian activists had provoked the violence, in hopes of bolstering Russia’s claim that it needed to intervene in order to protect Russian-speakers and return calm.
Stringer / Reuters

18. On March 14, Kerry met Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov in London. The talks did not go well.

On March 14, Kerry met Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov in London. The talks did not go well.
Pool / Reuters

19. Lavrov said after the meeting that Russia had no plans to “invade” Ukraine. The Russian Foreign Ministry also issued a statement that same day saying Russia “reserved the right” to protect its “countrymen” in Ukraine.

Lavrov said after the meeting that Russia had no plans to "invade" Ukraine. The Russian Foreign Ministry also issued a statement that same day saying Russia "reserved the right" to protect its "countrymen" in Ukraine.
Suzanne Plunkett / Reuters

20. With ever more talk of war, tens of thousands of Muscovites rallied against Russia’s intervention in Ukraine. It was the largest anti-Putin protest in two years. In east Ukraine, another two pro-Ukrainian activists died as clashes escalated.

With ever more talk of war, tens of thousands of Muscovites rallied against Russia's intervention in Ukraine. It was the largest anti-Putin protest in two years. In east Ukraine, another two pro-Ukrainian activists died as clashes escalated.
Maxim Shemetov / Reuters

21. On March 17, Obama issued a new executive order imposing fresh sanctions and visa bans on 11 Russians and Ukrainians, including seven high-ranking Russian government officials, for their role in the Crimea referendum and Ukraine escalation.

On March 17, Obama issued a new executive order imposing fresh sanctions and visa bans on 11 Russians and Ukrainians, including seven high-ranking Russian government officials, for their role in the Crimea referendum and Ukraine escalation.
Kevin Lamarque / Reuters

A White House official called them the most “comprehensive” sanctions on Russia since the end of the Cold War. The European Union also put sanctions on 21 officials involved with Crimea’s breakaway efforts.

22. Crimea’s referendum is over — but pro- and anti-Russia activists continue to clash in Ukraine’s east, as Russian troops and armored vehicles amass along the border. In Kiev, many worry that region may be the new flashpoint.

Crimea's referendum is over — but pro- and anti-Russia activists continue to clash in Ukraine's east, as Russian troops and armored vehicles amass along the border. In Kiev, many worry that region may be the new flashpoint.
Valentyn Ogirenko / Reuters

Source: Miriam Berger for Buzzfeed